CIS: 40 Million Immigrants in U.S. in 2010

By:  R. Cort Kirkwood
08/13/2012
       
CIS: 40 Million Immigrants in U.S. in 2010

 The latest survey of immigrants to the United States shows their numbers increased massively under the last two presidents, reaching a record high in 2010. That’s just one of the trends noted in “Immigrants in the United States: A Profile of America’s Foreign-Born Population,” published by the Center for Immigration Studies. CIS gathered its data from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. Those data show that immigrants from the Third World are swamping the United States and its public institutions.

The latest survey of immigrants to the United States shows their numbers increased massively under the last two presidents, reaching a record high in 2010. That’s just one of the trends noted in the study “Immigrants in the United States: A Profile of America’s Foreign-Born Population,” published by the Center for Immigration Studies. CIS gathered its data from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. Those data show that immigrants from the Third World are swamping the United States and its public institutions.

The Overall Numbers

According to CIS, “The number of immigrants (legal and illegal) in the country hit a new record of 40 million in 2010.”

About 14 million of those 40 million foreigners began arriving just as the open-borders Bush administration assumed power. “This would translate into 1.3 to 1.4 million new arrivals annually during the last decade,” CIS concluded, or about a 28 percent increase over the 31.1 million foreigners here in 2000. The Center continued,

Some prior research indicates that 5.2 percent of immigrants are missed in the ACS. So the actual level of new immigrants could be closer to 1.5 million a year during the decade just completed.

The 2000 census also included a year-of-arrival question and found that 13.2 million immigrants arrived during the preceding decade and were still in the county in 2000.

The states with the highest number of immigrants are California (10.2 million), New York (4.3 million), Texas (4.1 million), Florida (3.6 million), New Jersey (1.8 million), and Illinois (1.7 million).

The states with the highest concentration versus the population at large are California (27.2 percent), New York (22.2 percent), New Jersey (21 percent), Florida (19.4 percent), Nevada (18.8 percent), Hawaii (18.2 percent), and Texas (16.4 percent).

Southern states saw the highest growth rates.

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Photo of Mexican immigrants to the United States marching for more rights in San Jose, CA.

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