Education and Politics

By:  Sam Blumenfeld
10/19/2012
       
Education and Politics

Education is the orphan issue of this presidential campaign, because the subject is too complex and too volatile to be decently handled in the kind of debates that Gov. Romney and President Obama have been engaged in. There is simply not enough time to do the subject justice. Besides, both Romney and Obama believe that the federal government has a role to play in public education: Obama a lot more; Romney a little less, but not enough difference to make it a hot issue.

As I’ve said in previous articles, education is the orphan issue of this presidential campaign. Why? Because the subject is too complex and too volatile to be decently handled in the kind of debates that Gov. Romney and President Obama have been engaged in. There is simply not enough time to do the subject justice. Besides, both Romney and Obama believe that the federal government has a role to play in public education: Obama a lot more; Romney a little less, but not enough difference to make it a hot issue.

Yet, as we all know, the future of America will be largely determined by how we educate American children. The present government education system, now largely empowered by the federal government’s largesse, is atheist, behaviorist, and academically corrupt. It is the worst kind of education system for a free people who are in the vast majority believers in biblical religion. All of the reforms being pushed by so-called conservatives such as Jeb Bush are leading toward the final construction of a national education system in which local taxpayers will have as little power as possible to control their local schools. They may have control over parking spaces, and the creation of charter schools, but that seems to be what all of this is leading to.

The road to a national education system began in 1965 with Lyndon Johnson’s signing of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, which opened the coffers of the U.S. Treasury to the grubby hands of the educators. They wanted more money — billions more — and they got it, courtesy of liberal Democrats and a liberal president. But it was the beginning of the incremental march toward a national education system. That is what the National Education Association always wanted. They had said as much in their very first meeting in 1857 in Philadelphia where the presidents of 10 state teachers associations gathered to create a national body. Thomas W. Valentine, president of the New York Teachers Association, told the delegates:

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Sam Blumenfeld (photo)

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