Philosophers: Drug Humans, Give Them Cat Eyes, Murder Infants

By:  R. Cort Kirkwood
03/16/2012
       
Philosophers: Drug Humans, Give Them Cat Eyes, Murder Infants

If the proposal that murdering infants with so-called “after-birth abortion” isn’t enough to ring the alarm bells about the state of higher learning, perhaps this one is: An alleged philosopher at New York University wants to combat “climate change” by drugging or genetically engineering humans.

If the proposal that murdering infants with so-called “after-birth abortion” isn’t enough to ring the alarm bells about the state of higher learning, perhaps this one is: An alleged philosopher at New York University wants to combat “climate change” by drugging or genetically engineering humans.

In the world S. Matthew Liao envisions, we would be repulsed by eating meat, begat miniature children, and see in the dark through cat eyes.
 
The professor’s theory is that by changing human beings at the genetic level, or giving them drugs, he can alter them to combat climate change and help the environment. He even believes he can alter a man to make him more charitable.
 
Liao’s describes his Brave New World in a paper for Ethics, Policy & Environment, which he detailed in an interview with The Atlantic, a leftist magazine.
 
Meat Is Bad
Eating meat, Liao says, is bad: “There is a widely cited U.N. Food and Agricultural Organization report that estimates that 18% of the world's greenhouse gas emissions and CO2 equivalents come from livestock farming, which is actually a much higher share than from transportation.”

Livestock farming accounts for as much as 51% of the world's greenhouse gas emissions. And then there are estimates that as much as 9% of human emissions occur as a result of deforestation for the expansion of pastures for livestock. And that doesn't even to take into account the emissions that arise from manure, or from the livestock directly.…
 
Even a minor 21% to 24% reduction in the consumption of these kinds of meats could result in the same reduction in emissions as the total localization of food production, which would mean reducing “food miles” to zero.

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