Commentary
A lot of ink has been spilled in the past several days over Sunday's 40th anniversary of the famous break-in at the Democratic Party headquarters at the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C. For nearly a year the major media appeared to accept then-Attorney General and future prison inmate John Mitchell's description of the event as a "third-rate burglary" by some pro-Nixon knight-errants in a vain effort to get some "dirt" on the opposition. Little more was heard of the break-in for the rest of 1972, and it surely did no harm to Nixon's political fortunes as the President that November carried 49 states, 10 years to the day after losing an election for Governor in California and his announcement to reporters that they would not "have Nixon to kick around anymore." It was the completion of one of the greatest comebacks in American political history.
The President's speech on the economy in Cleveland last week, promoted as "important," was a bust, especially among his most ardent supporters.  
 In yet another victory for the forces of politically correct insanity, voters in North Dakota voted to dump the mascot of the University of North Dakota (UND). The Fighting Sioux are no more.  According to the Bismarck Tribune, more than 67 percent of voters approved of Measure 4, a ballot initiative that ended the long struggle between the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and its supporters, on the one hand, and those who love and revere the formidable-looking Indian logo the school has used for many moons.
The question is, should the computer be used to replace the teacher in educating students, or should the student merely learn how to use a computer? Has the computer become merely another edu-fad that neither teachers nor students know quite what to do with? Many believe that, with or without computers, the teacher is still the most important person in the classroom.
Approximately 18 months after the "Arab Spring" uprising began in Egypt, the final outcome of the rebellion that ended the reign of President Hosni Mubarak remains to be seen. With press reports of a small turnout in Egypt’s runoff presidential elections that are intended to pick the successor of a man who led his nation for three decades, it is possible that the nation’s electorate may be choosing “none of the above.”
At least 123 delegates to the Republican National Convention have joined as plaintiffs in a lawsuit seeking to block the Republican National Committee from forcing them to cast their votes for the presumptive nominee, Mitt Romney.
Minnesota's General Mills has come out against a proposed state constitutional amendment that would define marriage as only between a man and a woman.
The British government is proposing a bill that would force communications providers to log details of every e-mail, telephone call, and text message in the U.K. and make this information available to law enforcement on request.
Texas Republican Congressman Ron Paul emerged from the Iowa state convention with a clear majority of the delegates being sent by the state to the GOP national convention in Tampa in August. Paul won 21 of the 25 contestable delegates, and will have 23 of the 28 total delegates Iowa will send to Tampa.
As Egyptians await word of the outcome of the the weekend's runnoff elections for a new president for their nation, the fate of the Egypt seems more uncertain than at any time since the “Arab Spring.” Only months ago, the Muslim Brotherhood had allegedly been plotting to export their Islamist revolution to neighboring countries. Now, a panel of judges has dissolved the new parliament, and is permitting Egypt’s former prime minister to run for President.
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