After Columbine: Why School Shootings Still Happen

By:  Sam Blumenfeld
05/10/2012
       
After Columbine: Why School Shootings Still Happen

The killing of three students by a fellow student at Chardon High School in Chardon, Ohio, on February 27, 2012, indicates that whatever problems existed that led to or caused the massacre at Columbine on April 20, 1999 have not gone away.

 

The killing of three students by a fellow student at Chardon High School in Chardon, Ohio, on February 27, 2012, indicates that whatever problems existed that led to or caused the massacre at Columbine on April 20, 1999 have not gone away. Indeed, only a week after Columbine, on April 28, 1999, in Taber, Alberta, Canada, one student was killed and one wounded at W. R. Myers High School. The gunman, 14-year-old Todd Cameron Smith, walked into his school and began firing at three students in a hallway, killing one student and wounding another. Because this shooting took place only eight days after the Columbine High School Massacre in Littleton, Colorado, it was widely believed to have been a copycat crime. It was the first fatal high-school shooting in Canada in more than two decades.

A month after Columbine, on May 20, 1999, at Heritage High School in Conyers, Georgia, six students were injured by a 15-year-old shooter, Thomas Solomon, who was reportedly depressed after breaking up with his girlfriend. The shots were fired about 20 minutes before school started. The gunman, a sophomore, was quickly taken into custody. The six injured students were taken to hospitals, where two were treated and released and the other four recovered. The shots were fired in a common area around 8 a.m., near a cafeteria where some students were eating breakfast.

On November 19, 1999, in Deming, New Mexico, Victor Cordova, Jr., 12, shot and killed 13-year-old Araceli Tena in the lobby of the Deming Middle School. And on December 6, 1999, at Fort Gibson, Oklahoma, four students were wounded when Seth Trickey, 13, opened fire with a 9mm semiautomatic handgun at the Fort Gibson Middle School.

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Sam Blumenfeld (photo)

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