Columbine Revisited: What Have We Learned?

By:  Sam Blumenfeld
04/20/2012
       
Columbine Revisited: What Have We Learned?

On April 20, 1999, two all-American boys, Eric Harris, 18, and Dylan Klebold, 17, born and bred in the greatest, freest, most prosperous nation on earth, perpetrated the greatest massacre in an American high school. They had intended to kill a thousand students by placing two bombs in the school cafeteria timed to go off during the height of the lunch period. They planned to sit in their cars in the parking lot, watch the building explode, and intended to kill any students who tried to flee from the inferno. But their plans went awry. The two bombs, hidden in two duffle bags, never went off, but the two teenage monsters managed to kill 12 students and a teacher.

 
 

 On April 20, 1999, two all-American boys, Eric Harris, 18, and Dylan Klebold, 17, born and bred in the greatest, freest, most prosperous nation on earth, perpetrated the greatest massacre in an American high school. They had intended to kill a thousand students by placing two bombs in the school cafeteria timed to go off during the height of the lunch period. They planned to sit in their cars in the parking lot, watch the building explode, and intended to kill any students who tried to flee from the inferno. But their plans went awry. The two bombs, hidden in two duffle bags, never went off, but the two teenage monsters managed to kill 12 students and a teacher.

Have we learned anything from what took place at Columbine High School 13 years ago? In 2009, the first full-length investigation of the massacre was published with a great deal of mind-numbing information that no one knew about in 1999. The book Columbine was written by Dave Cullen, a liberal journalist, who did an excellent job of combing all of the sources of information now available to an investigative reporter. But his liberal mindset prevented him from looking into the humanist education these two killers had been given by their schools for 12 years. As Rev. R. J. Rushdoony had written: “Humanism is the institutionalized love of death.”
 
In a way, the Columbine story reminded me of the 9/11 story in which the authorities in charge of our safety were so crippled by their humanist mentality that they couldn’t see evil even if it hit them in the face. The two Columbine killers spent a year and a half planning their massacre and left a trail of clues that should have awakened the sleepiest of police to look into what these two young men were up to. Indeed, they were warned by Randy and Judy Brown, parents of Aaron Brown, a Columbine student who knew Eric Harris and was aware that he was up to no good. According to Cullen:
 
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Sam Blumenfeld (photo)
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