New York City Launches Sex-advice Smartphone App for Teens

By:  Dave Bohon
06/03/2013
       
New York City Launches Sex-advice Smartphone App for Teens

New York City's health department has launched a smartphone app that offers teens advice on sex, pregnancy, birth control, abortion, and homosexual relationships, while sidestepping parental involvement.

New York City's health department has launched a smartphone app that offers teens advice on sex, pregnancy, birth control, abortion, and homosexual relationships, among other “sexual health” issues. Predictably, the app sidesteps all parental involvement, assuring youth who download the resource that they “have the right to sexual health services without getting permission from parents, girlfriends/boyfriends, or anyone else.”

New York City Health Commissioner Thomas Farley insisted that most parents his agency consulted with are on board with the app. “The Teens in NYC mobile app provides information in ways that are familiar to teens so they have can access to these services,” Farley said. “Teenagers are often embarrassed to talk to people about sex, especially their parents.”

CBS News noted that the app, which is available for both iPhones and Google Android devices, “features sex education videos, including one about a girl who is confused about her sexual orientation. Users can also use it to locate places to get free condoms, a pregnancy test, or counseling.”

Focus on the Family's CitizenLink pro-family activist website reported that the app includes videos such as “Samantha’s Story,” which features a girl discussing the five-month sexual relationship she has had with her boyfriend, along with the same-sex attraction she feels toward her best friend. The “Samantha” video “also mentions a trip to an 'LGBT-friendly' center where a counselor says her same-sex attractions are 'totally normal,'” reports CitizenLink.

In another video featured on the app, a teenage girl reflects on how she had originally wanted to save sex for marriage, until she gave in to her boyfriend. “I didn’t want to freak out Lewis and make him think that I regretted it, because I didn’t,” she says. “But by the end of the day I was really panicking. I don’t want to get pregnant right now. There’s too much else I want to do.”

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