Although it was passed in May by an overwhelming majority by the House of Representatives, the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2013 is stalled in the Senate. During 45 minutes of partisan debate late last month, Republican leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) verbally sparred with his Democratic counterpart, Harry Reid (Nev.), the one accusing the other of dragging his feet on bills each sponsored.
In an apparent attempt to bind not only those delegates who support Ron Paul, but the tongues of those delegates as well, the Republican National Committee (RNC) is trying to intimidate the delegates from Maine into casting their votes for the presumptive nominee, Mitt Romney. After being rebuffed by the Maine delegation, the state's Republican Party proposed a compromise and on August 7, Maine’s delegation rejected that compromise.
On Monday lawyers representing the Obama administration filed an appeal challenging an injunction issued by a federal judge in May barring the enforcement of the indefinite detention provision of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). This was likely a premature response to a ruling expected on a hearing held Tuesday to make the temporary injunction permanent.  
Missouri voters Tuesday overwhelmingly approved a "Right to Pray" amendment to the state's Constitution, which will almost surely be challenged in federal court. Amendment 2, approved by a vote of roughly 5 to 1, includes a provision that guarantees students the right to take part in prayer in public schools on a voluntary basis.
Supply Side economics school godfather Arthur Laffer penned an op-ed column for the Wall Street Journal August 6 that claims increases in government spending inhibited economic growth during the recession, as indicated by a study showing "increases in government spending from 2007 to 2009 and subsequent changes in GDP growth rates. Of the 34 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development [OECD] nations, those with the largest spending spurts from 2007 to 2009 saw the least growth in GDP rates before and after the stimulus."
 As congressional Republicans continue their assault on President Obama’s seemingly failed “green” agenda, the White House announced August 7 it will expedite seven federal wind and solar projects across four western states. The programs, which will be grounded in Nevada, Arizona, California, and Wyoming, will generate enough power to run 1.5 million homes, the White House said in a press release.
Oxford University, which for centuries has set one of the strictest trends for academic propriety, announced that it is doing away with its staid formal academic dress code in favor of one that is more sensitive to transvestites and other “transgender” individuals.
A conservative coalition led by Republican Gov. Sam Brownback routed moderate incumbents in Kansas GOP Senate primary races August 7, giving the Topeka State House a strong rightward tilt in one of the nation’s most solidly Republican states.  
 After reviewing the weak jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) that was released last Friday, the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, Eric Rosengren, decided it was time to call for more money to be added to the economy.  
 "Many social and personality psychologists admit that they would discriminate against openly conservative colleagues,” according to a study to be published next month by two psychologists, the Washington Times reported last week.  The psychologists who were questioned in the study admitted that they would openly attempt to keep conservative colleagues from teaching at a university or publishing papers in peer-reviewed journals.
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