U.K. May Soon Vote to Leave EU Despite Massive Pressure

By:  Alex Newman
08/13/2012
       
U.K. May Soon Vote to Leave EU Despite Massive Pressure

 As the European Union continues to assume ever greater powers over the once-sovereign nations of the region, voters in the United Kingdom have been fed up for a while. In fact, if they were allowed to vote in a referendum, polls consistently show the U.K. would overwhelmingly opt to ditch the EU once and for all. And analysts, as well as activists on both sides of the issue, believe the day may soon come where British resistance to the emerging super-state finally prevails.  

As the European Union continues to assume ever greater powers over the once-sovereign nations of the region, voters in the United Kingdom have been fed up for a while. In fact, if they were allowed to vote in a referendum, polls consistently show the U.K. would overwhelmingly opt to ditch the EU once and for all. And analysts, as well as activists on both sides of the issue, believe the day may soon come where British resistance to the emerging super-state finally prevails.

According to a German newspaper, the will of U.K. voters ultimately being fulfilled has former Prime Minister Tony Blair “deeply worried.” Meanwhile, a strategy paper by Asian banking behemoth Nomura showed that the bank is preparing for what its analysts believe is an increasingly likely scenario: British withdrawal, or at the very least, a mass repatriation of powers usurped by the Brussels-based entity.

Responding to overwhelming public pressure even from within his own party, current Prime Minister David Cameron has pretended to take a firm stance against some of the most enormous EU power grabs — more than three quarters of the laws in Europe now come from the EU. Most recently in December, his government rejected a massive European “fiscal treaty” that would have further centralized taxation and spending authority in Brussels.

Like several other U.K. political leaders, Cameron campaigned on a platform of allowing voters to decide the nation’s future relationship with the expanding EU super-state. Indeed, the promises likely played a crucial role in bringing him to power in the first place. Once Cameron became Prime Minister, however, he refused to allow a referendum.

Last month, facing dissenters even among leaders in his own conservative party — not to mention the surge to prominence of anti-EU political parties such as the U.K. Independence Party that threaten the ruling political class — Cameron reluctantly agreed to possibly consider allowing a referendum at some point in the future. Or not. Most of his statements were typical political pandering with no concrete pledges.

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