3D Printing of Guns at Home Making Gun Grabbers Nervous

By:  Bob Adelmann
02/01/2013
       
3D Printing of Guns at Home Making Gun Grabbers Nervous

As prices of 3D printers decline and the availability of software for such printers increases, the opportunity for average citizens to manufacture their own firearms at home is making legislators increasingly nervous.

As prices of 3D printers decline and the availability of software for such printers increases, the opportunity for average citizens to manufacture their own firearms at home is making legislators increasingly nervous.

When the New York Times wrote of the improved technology of 3D printing this writer responded with a frivolous blog about it, scoring the concerns of anti-gun people about how the technology will allow everyone who wants one to have a gun without government oversight or knowledge. One of those in the anti-gun camp is Josh Horwitz, executive director of the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence, who said that 3D printing is “going to be a big concern. We don’t know how that’s going to come about and don’t know what technology.”

That technology is evolving before his very eyes. The RepRap Project aims to produce free and open source software for 3D printers, including software that allows the printer to produce its own parts. Two years ago RepRap allowed printers to create tiny plastic parts for small motors as well as circuit boards for computers. Today it allows hobbyists to build household items like fully-functional clocks, flashlights, iPad cases, watchbands … and receivers for rifles.

And it is this virtual explosion in technology that is making other gun controllers increasingly nervous, including Mark Gibbs, a contributor at Forbes, who wrote,

I’m in favor of tighter gun control and a ban on weapons that are unnecessarily powerful but I’m afraid that technology will soon make any legislation that limits the availability of any kinds of guns ineffective.

With the decrease in prices for 3D printers, and the improvement in the software to drive them, the capability to print weapons at home is coming into the reach of the average citizen. Gibbs warned,

Click here to read the entire article.

Photo of 3D printer on display at International Consumer Electronics Show Jan. 10 in Las Vegas: AP Images

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