As the international effort to deploy so-called “smart meters” to monitor electricity usage marches on, resistance to the controversial devices is increasing around the world as well. Proponents claim the schemes could save money and reduce energy use. Opponents from across the political spectrum, however, worry that the smart meters might not be just a stupid idea and a waste of money — they could actually be dangerous in more ways than one.  
The Department of Homeland Security will extend the president’s order to halt deportation of illegals to homosexuals if they have “family ties,” the agency announced last week. The move to protect what are now called “LGBT” (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) immigrants came after seven dozen Democrats went to bat for these illegals.
As the technology facilitating the expansion of the surveillance state becomes more advanced, the need for proximity to the target of the surveillance diminishes. For example, the ability to keep drones perpetually airborne is being engineered thanks to multi-million dollar research and development grants offered by the Pentagon to companies on the edge of technological advancement.
 The Tennessee Democratic Party has officially rejected its own nominee, Mark Clayton, for the upcoming U.S. Senate race against incumbent Republican Sen. Bob Corker, citing the liberty-minded Democrat candidate’s affiliation with a pro-life group that defends the traditional definition of marriage. But despite a wave of vicious attacks by far-left ideologues, Clayton, who promised to strictly respect the Constitution, is already finding some tepid support for his candidacy among conservatives, Tea Party activists, and libertarians across the country — especially on social media.  
A group of black pastors has launched a campaign to challenge black voters to rethink their support for President Barack Obama, saying that his endorsement of same-sex "marriage" places him at odds with America’s Judeo-Christian foundations and with the values embraced by a majority of black Americans.
Nearly 3 percent of the households that receive food stamps in United States would have been ineligible to receive them if the income eligibility rules had not been changed, the Government Accountability Office has reported.
 Evident in Olympic rule application is something I wrote about mere days ago: the triumph of Muslim absolutism over Western relativism. Whether Muslims are right or wrong in a given instance, they’re sure of themselves in every instance. They don’t capitulate, waver, or apologize. They’re brazen. And Westerners? They’re craven. Even the values they profess most — brotherhood, tolerance, sensitivity, open-mindedness, antipathy for discrimination — are situational. Like athletes, these values are subject to expulsion when inconvenient.
 Imagine that the U.S. government had the power to scour the reams of public records and collect and collate every bit of personal information about every citizen of this country. Now imagine that any of the various intelligence and security agencies within the government could combine that data with any other information about a person that has been posted to a social media website or compiled by one of the many data aggregating companies that keep tabs on all of us.
A Washington Times article published in 2010 suggested that in order to hold onto a Democratic Party majority in Congress, President Barack Obama was exacerbating racial tension by turning his attention to minorities to the exclusion of white voters. The president is quoted in the piece saying, “It will be up to each of you to make sure that the young people, African-Americans, Latinos and women, who powered our victory in 2008, stand together once again.”
 Senator Rand Paul began with a story that got a huge laugh from standing-room-only crowd at FreedomFest. “As you may know,” he said, “I have sort of a love/hate relationship with the TSA.” He paused and then added, “Well, let’s be honest. It’s more of a hate/hate relationship.”
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