A journalist is arrested, convicted by a kangaroo court, and imprisoned because he reports stories embarrassing to the government under which he lives. After a great public outcry, the President of the country is preparing to pardon him when he receives a telephone call from the leader of a foreign country. That leader, also shamed by the journalist’s reporting, asks him to keep the man behind bars. The President complies; and an innocent man remains incarcerated for the crime of telling the truth.
Goldman Sachs Corporation is facing a new wave of charges of not looking out for the interests of its clients this week, as one corporate vice president published a resignation March 14 letter in the New York Times and the company agreed March 13 to pay a $7 million fine to the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. Goldman Sachs stock took a hit on the two-pronged attack March 14, losing $2.2 billion in stock value with a three-percent plunge, though the stock recovered significantly the next day.  
John Liu’s ties to the Communist Party leadership of China and North Korea, as well as his connections to the Communist Workers Party in New York City, should have been sufficient to stop his political career long ago. However, the New York City media not only turned a blind eye to Liu’s troubling relations with our nation’s avowed enemies, they also provided him with favorable coverage that enabled him to be elected comptroller, the city’s chief financial officer.  
President Barack Obama's reelection campaign will launch a YouTube video Thursday evening that will feature a 17-minute Hollywood-style video at a site that will function as a "one-stop shopping" venue to enlist volunteers, solicit contributions, and disseminate information and campaign videos on an ongoing basis. The interactive technology "will allow viewers to post campaign content to their Facebook pages, volunteer and donate all without having to leave Mr. Obama's dedicated YouTube page," the New York Times reported Thursday. The site reflects a growing reliance on "social media" of political campaigns, which have traditionally run all their videos and audio messages on TV and radio.
An Oregon couple has won a $3 million settlement from a Portland hospital they sued after doctors missed diagnosing their daughter’s Down’s syndrome before she was born, thereby depriving them of the opportunity to abort her. As reported by the Oregonian newspaper, Ariel and Deborah Levy insisted that they would have aborted daughter Kalanit, who is now four years old, had Portland’s Legacy Health hospital informed them of her disability.
A former computer specialist with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is suing the agency, charging that he was demoted and then fired for promoting his views on intelligent design, the belief that an intelligent power was responsible for creating the universe.  
Encyclopædia Britannica’s president Jorge Cauz announced on Tuesday that his company would no longer print its 129-pound, 32-volume sets of its iconic print encyclopedias. He put the best face possible on the decision:    
Rather than merely calling Vladimir Putin on the telephone to congratulate him on his March 4 election victory for a new term as president of Russia, Silvio Berlusconi hopped in his jet and headed for Sochi, the Russian resort town that will be the site for the 2014 Winter Olympics. The Italian billionaire and media mogul, who resigned his position as Italy’s prime minister last November, is embroiled in legal battles over charges of bribery, corruption, illegal wiretapping, and sex with an underage prostitute, but those concerns took back burner to his party time with Putin.
March 16 is the birthday of James Madison, known as the "Father of the Constitution." Several years ago, the American Society of News Editors initiated a program called Sunshine Week, intended to coincide with the birthday of this illustrious Founding Father. The purpose of Sunshine Week was "to educate the public about the importance of open government and the dangers of excessive and unnecessary secrecy."  
In an economic transaction, who should be the one saying thank you — the buyer or the seller? Or in an employment relationship, who should be thanking the other — the employer or the employee?  
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