President Barack Obama, a Democrat, wants Congress to extend a student loan interest rate cut set to expire in July; Mitt Romney, the odds-on favorite to head the Republican ticket opposing Obama in November, agrees. Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, a Republican considered a likely running mate for Romney, is pushing a bill that would allow young illegal immigrants to remain in the United States legally under certain conditions; Romney refuses to say whether he supports it despite having privately endorsed it. What gives?
The armed forces of the Communist Chinese and Russian governments began a series of unprecedented joint naval “war games” over the weekend as part of a deepening “strategic partnership” between the two powers, sparking concerns among geopolitical analysts. The controversial exercises are expected to last all week.
A black man in Chicago has admitted being so angry about the Trayvon Martin case that he robbed and beat up a white man this week. According to the Chicago Sun-Times, Alton L. Hayes II and a younger accomplice battered the victim and made racially intimidating remarks.
Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin announced April 20 that it was suspending the distribution of the abortion pill RU-486, citing a new state law that has tightened the restrictions on what has come to be known as “non-surgical” or “web cam” abortions — so named because abortionists can approve the procedure without personally examining a pregnant mother.
 Whatever the ultimate outcome of the case against George Zimmerman for his shooting of Trayvon Martin, what has happened already is enough to turn the stomach of anyone who believes in either truth or justice.
This is “cybersecurity week,” according to Brock Meeks at Wired.com when CISPA (the Orwellian-named Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act) is scheduled to move to the House floor for a vote. Offered originally before SOPA (the Stop Online Piracy Act) and its sister PIPA (Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property Act) were blown up in January, Reps. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.) and Dutch Ruppersberger (D-Md.) have offered some amendments to the bill (H.R. 3523) to soften some of its critics and to avoid the same result.
In a well-researched article published online last month by The New American, Brian Koenig succinctly described capital cronyism. Koenig writes:  
“I think the Affordable Care Act is the single least popular piece of major domestic legislation in the last 70 years. It was not popular when it passed; it’s less popular now. I think the worst thing that could happen to Barack Obama’s reelection campaign would be if he had to spend four months this fall explaining what ObamaCare 2 would look like.”
Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, the purported founders of communism, established in the 19th century a government paradigm that transformed Europe and other regions in the eastern hemisphere, adding to an already expansive repertoire of political ideologies. And the seemingly farfetched assertion that communism could someday take control of America seems, quite simply, unfathomable. But is it really that improbable, or furthermore, has it already ensnared certain sectors of society?  
To look at the streets of Reykjavik, Iceland, an alien would be hard-pressed to see any aftereffects of the banking crisis that nearly bankrupted the country in 2008. The capitol of the 40,000-square-mile island just below the Arctic Circle between Greenland and the United Kingdom is the country's largest city where nearly two-thirds of the island's 320,000 inhabitants reside. Unemployment is down, economic growth is positive, and its streets are calm.
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