A new report published by the World Bank has come to a spellbinding conclusion: High government spending and large public sectors substantially diminish economic growth. In fact, a slew of establishment economists and organizations have come to a similar conclusion. Daniel J. Mitchell, senior fellow at the Cato Institute, explained in a recent article that the era of socialism is over, and the field of economics is migrating toward a more laissez-faire ideology, where governmental authority is weakened and economies become more privatized.  
The dictionary defines “boondoggle” as: “work or activity that is wasteful or pointless but gives the appearance of having value.” And President Obama's Common Core Standards education boondoggle is going to cost billions of dollars, which everyone involved — educators, administrators, career counselors, assorted federal bureaucrats, textbook writers, and textbook publishers — will be more than happy to rake in.    
If President Obama is reelected in 2012, he would unlawfully seek to infringe upon the God-given right to keep and bear arms enshrined in the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, warned National Rifle Association (NRA) executive vice president Wayne LaPierre on Friday.  
Western governments and the notorious al-Qaeda terror network have teamed up to bring down the relatively secular dictatorship of Bashar al-Assad in Syria, eerily reminiscent of the “regime change” operation in Libya supported by both NATO and a broad coalition of well-known Islamic terrorists on the ground.    
Well, he didn’t make Time magazine’s “Person of the Year.” But Warren Buffett did make the cover of the magazine last month. The picture showed him smiling an impish grin. The article inside explained why.
An armed uprising in Libya is imminent as people in the oil-rich North African nation continue to reject the new NATO-backed regime, one of slain Libyan despot Muammar Gadhafi’s sons told an Arabic TV station on Friday from neighboring Niger. Libya’s new rulers dismissed the statements and threatened the “interests” of the government of Niger if it did not hand over Saadi Gadhafi for prosecution.  
After sailing through the subcommittee in late December, last Thursday by a vote of 11-7 the full Senate Judiciary Committee passed on to the full chamber a bill that would permit televising proceedings of the U.S. Supreme Court.
An attorney for an American accused of conspiring to carry out the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 has filed suit in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia challenging a new rule at the Guantanamo Bay Detention Facility instructing agents of the military and the government to read all correspondence between lawyers and those prisoners suspected of being 9/11 conspirators.  
United Nations boss Ban Ki-moon and his top deputies gathered in secret last year to chart the future course of humanity through “sustainable development,” a controversial concept the UN equates with “saving the planet” in what would ultimately entail a radical and complete transformation of human civilization. But even though the erection of a global so-called “green-economy” regime is a top UN priority, leaked minutes of the meeting revealed that the term itself remains undefined.
U.S. regulators on Thursday authorized plans to construct the nation’s first nuclear power plant in three decades, despite concerns stemming from Japan’s 2011 earthquake that led to a meltdown at the Fukushima nuclear plant last March. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) voted 4-1 to grant Atlanta-based Southern Company a license to begin operating two new reactors at its existing Vogtle plant in Georgia, which will cost about $14 billion and are expected to enter service as early as 2016 and 2017.  
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