“The United Nations does extraordinary good around the world — feeding the hungry, caring for the sick, mending places that have been broken. But it also struggles to enforce its will, and to live up to the ideals of its founding. I believe that those imperfections are not a reason to walk away from this institution — they are a calling to redouble our efforts. The United Nations can either be a place where we bicker about outdated grievances, or forge common ground; a place where we focus on what drives us apart, or what brings us together; a place where we indulge tyranny, or a source of moral authority. In short, the United Nations can be an institution that is disconnected from what matters in the lives of our citizens, or it can be an indispensable factor in advancing the interests of the people we serve.”  
Judge Robert Blackburn of the U.S. District Court of Colorado ruled on Monday that a defendant must decrypt her laptop computer so that prosecutors can open the files containing data they need to complete building their case against her.  
The Dutch Muslim Party, an Islamist political party in the Netherlands, has announced its intention to compete for seats in the nation’s parliament. Given the success of the party in several smaller political campaigns — securing offices in Amsterdam, Rotterdam and other Dutch cities — it is possible that a party, which targets the approximately 6 percent of the nation’s population that identifies itself as Muslim, may find it has sufficient support to gain influence in the Dutch parliament.  
Just before Christmas the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) announced a small improvement to its 2,100 free online courses: The free online service will now grant, for a modest affordable fee, credentials for those online students who gain mastery of the subject. Instead of calling it MIT 2.0, they named it MITx, and it is likely to challenge and change the higher education paradigm and the cartel that runs it.  
Following a failed presidential bid that raised some doubts about her political future, U.S. Representative Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.) announced January 25 that she will run for a fourth term in Congress. Bachmann dropped out of the GOP presidential race after placing a dismal sixth in the January 3 Iowa caucuses, and observers had speculated that she may trade in her political career to work the lecture circuit and conservative talk media. But in an interview with the Associated Press she confirmed that she was “looking forward to coming back and bringing a strong, powerful voice to Washington, D.C.”  
House Republicans unleashed a barrage of criticism Wednesday during a House hearing on Chevrolet’s Volt electric car, after the head of the federal auto safety agency insisted that the vehicles are not dangerous. "The Chevrolet Volt is safe to drive and it has been safe to drive the whole time," David Strickland, head of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), told a congressional panel. "Not only would I drive it, I would [take] my wife, my mother and my baby sister along for the ride."  
Global elites — many of the 2,500 of them billionaires — are spending a few days in Davos, Switzerland, attending the World Economic Forum (WEF), a group founded in 1971 “committed to improving the state of the world.”  
After hundreds of thousands participated in the March for Life, while President Obama celebrated abortion on the 39th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, a new poll commissioned by the Knights of Columbus revealed that a whopping 79 percent of Americans are in favor of significantly restricting access to abortion. The numbers, largely unchanged from two years ago, also showed that more than half of Americans take what is considered by many activists to be a pro-life position.  
Book Review: Ron Paul: Father of the Tea Party, by Jason Rink, Variant Press, 2011, 255 pages, paperback. Ron Paul is one of those “overnight” sensations who are years, even decades in the making. Jason Rink, freelance writer and author from Austin, Texas, tells the story of the retired obstetrician and 12-term Congressman who is suddenly among the top contenders in presidential politics. The unmistakably friendly portrayal, advertised on the cover as “The Unauthorized Biography of an Unauthorized Politician,” offers an informative and entertaining life story of one of the most unusual and interesting presidential candidates in American history.  
Forget Mitt Romney and Bain Capital. If you want to find the real greedy one percent, you need look no further than Barack Obama.  According to tax returns released yesterday, Barack and Michelle Obama earned $1.2 million from 2000 through 2004 yet managed no more than $10,772 in charitable donations.
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