According to a new behavioral study, Spongebob SquarePants may cause short-term attention and learning problems in 4-year olds. The study indicates that watching a mere nine minutes of the program can have such an effect. Fox News reports: The problems were seen in a study of 60 children randomly assigned to either watch SpongeBob, or the slower-paced PBS cartoon Caillou or assigned to draw pictures. Immediately after these nine-minute assignments, the kids took mental function tests; those who had watched SpongeBob did measurably worse than the others. Those who watched SpongeBob SquarePants scored an average of 12 points lower than the other groups. The children who watched Calliou and drew pictures scored nearly the exact same. Another test administered to the three groups was how long the children were able to wait before eating snacks presented to them when the researcher left the room. Those who watched Calliou or drew illustrations waited approximately four minutes, as opposed to those children who watched Spongebob, who waited just two and a half minutes on average.
The National Association of Former Border Patrol Officers is calling for a reversal of the Obama administration’s “autocratic” policy designed to grant amnesty to illegal immigrants without so much as approval from Congress, saying the President has shown "contempt" for the Constitution and the laws he is sworn to uphold.  NAFBPO Chairman and former Assistant Chief Patrol Agent Kent Lundgren went even further. In an exclusive interview with Liberty News Network national correspondent Andy Ramirez, Lundgren said lawlessness from Obama and the Department of Homeland Security needed to be urgently stopped. “We have got to get the American people to look at this administration, rein it in, and say: ‘Hey, there are laws out there, you didn’t make them, you may not like them, but the Constitution says that you shall take care to see that they are executed, and you are not doing that. And listen up, we’re going to change things if you don’t,’” Lundgren said.
On August 31, with job creation grinding to a complete halt, U.S. Labor Secretary Hilda Solis was asked this question: “Why do you think there have been so many jobs created in the last decade in Texas?” She laughed and said, “Come again.”   The questioner rephrased his query, adding a citation: ”The Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas estimates about half of the jobs created in the U.S. in the last decade have been created in Texas. Why do you think that is?”   Replied Solis, “I haven’t done a lot of research in terms of the economic growth in Texas.”   It appears that Labor Secretary Solis had no interest in looking at how a state with 8 percent of the nation’s population had created nearly half of the nation’s new jobs over the past 10 years.
Under the authority of the Department of Justice (DOJ), over the past two years or so the Obama Administration has aggressively targeted pro-life activists and counselors who try to persuade women arriving at abortion clinics from killing their unborn babies. National Public Radio (NPR) reported that under the 1994 Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act (FACE), signed into law by President Clinton, “the Justice Department’s civil rights division has filed eight civil cases since the start of the Obama administration. That’s a big increase over the George W. Bush years, when one case was filed in eight years.” Subtly connecting the efforts of peaceful pro-lifers with the violent murder of late-term Wichita abortionist George Tiller by a lone gunman, NPR cited the claims of the National Abortion Federation that major violence against abortionists (which has never risen above isolated incidents — all of them condemned by legitimate pro-life groups) has plummeted over the past two years, thanks, in part, to DOJ diligence in pursuing “anti-abortion” activists.
The debate among Republican presidential candidates at the Reagan Library on Wednesday, Sept. 7th, provided a good deal of political theater. Every word spoken by the candidates, every facial expression, even their body language, enlivened the event. Brian Williams of NBC News and his cohort, John F. Harris, from Politico asked questions calculated to put each candidate on the spot. They especially wanted to pit Mitt Romney against Texas Governor Rick Perry. The result was quite a spirited combat that revealed the differences between the two candidates. Mitt Romney came across to this writer as a moderate Republican offering a good economic plan but not much else. He did not talk of repealing Obamacare, only issuing waivers. Hardly good enough for Tea Partiers. Michelle Bachmann, Herman Cain, and Ron Paul pledged to repeal Obamacare. Perry, however, got hung up on the Social Security issue. Romney pledged to save Social Security and make it better, which is what moderate Republicans always do with liberal programs. Perry called Social Security “a Ponzi scheme,” which sent Williams and Harris into convulsions of disbelief. A Ponzi scheme? It sounded off the wall but was nevertheless true.
In his speech on the economy on September 8, President Barack Obama tied our nation's fiscal recovery to the passage of three free trade agreements (FTA) currently awaiting approval. Said the president: Now it’s time to clear the way for a series of trade agreements that would make it easier for American companies to sell their products in Panama and Colombia and South Korea — while also helping the workers whose jobs have been affected by global competition.  (Applause.)  If Americans can buy Kias and Hyundais, I want to see folks in South Korea driving Fords and Chevys and Chryslers.  (Applause.)  I want to see more products sold around the world stamped with the three proud words:  “Made in America.”  That’s what we need to get done. While the Republicans may disagree with much of what the president proposed, their leadership is adamantly and enthusiastically behind the trade agreements. Evidence of the bipartisan support for the agreements is found everywhere. Last week, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Kent.) wrote an op-ed piece in the Washington Post lamenting the languishing of the trade agreements on President Obama’s desk and imploring him to pass them along to Congress.
Democratic Representative Dennis Kucinich of Ohio has been harshly critical of the Obama administration as of late, and is now advocating a challenge to President Obama in a primary. According to Kucinich, such an endeavor would likely turn Obama into a better president. Kucinich said on CNN: Can I see someone coming forward to challenge President Obama from the ranks of the Democratic Party? I suppose it’s possible. There again, it’s going to be about the economy, and that’s what it should be about. We have to get America back to work. And frankly, we have to stop wasting money on these wars that’s causing us to be able to lose the resources we need to focus money at home. So should President Obama have a challenge? I say he should. I think it would make him a better president if he received a Democratic challenge in the Democratic primary. Will I be that candidate? No.
Bob Turner, former television executive and the Republican candidate vying to secure Anthony Weiner’s former congressional seat, has swiped first place in a new poll by Siena College Research Institute. With one day to go before the Sept. 13 special election, Turner holds a six-point lead over Democratic Assemblyman David Weprin, a sharp turn from Siena College’s August 10 poll when Weprin led with 48 percent of likely voters over Turner’s 42 percent. "Turner holds a small five-point lead in the Queens portion of the district, where he was trailing by 10 points in the previous Siena College Poll, and he has increased his lead in Brooklyn from six points previously to a now healthy 12-point bulge," said Siena College pollster Steven Greenberg. Turner’s six-point lead has shocked many pundits and analysts, as the 9th Congressional District has historically been a "blue" district, with a Democrat holding the reign since 1923. The disparity in the candidates’ poll numbers stems from wavering loyalty to the Democratic Party and Turner’s edge on independent voters. "While Turner has an overwhelming 90-6 percent lead among Republicans, Weprin has only a 63-32 percent lead among Democrats, and Turner has a 38-point lead among likely independent voters," asserted Greenberg.
In a somewhat shocking announcement, former GOP presidential contender Tim Pawlenty announced that he will be endorsing Mitt Romney for president. The former Minnesota Governor sent an email to Romneys supporters early today indicating that Romney alone possesses the necessary qualities to bring America out of this economic crisis. Pawlenty also announced his endorsement online at the National Review. In a post entitled, “My Endorsement: Mitt Romney for President,” Pawlenty wrote:            Mitt Romney is running for president, and I am proud to endorse him. Alone among the contenders, he possesses the unique qualifications to confront and master our severe economic predicament. His abiding faith in our country’s exceptional historical position as a beacon of freedom will make him the most important leader in a world that depends upon a strong America to stay at peace.
The military-industrial complex is pulling out all the stops to ensure that not one dime of its vast federal largess is taken away even as the nation faces nearly $15 trillion in debt. Defense contractors, Representatives and Senators, and current and former Defense Secretaries are working together to thwart actual and potential cuts in defense spending resulting from the August debt ceiling deal. The deal calls for $350 billion in defense cuts over 10 years — an average of $35 billion per year. In addition, it tasks the newly created congressional super-committee with finding an additional $1.2 trillion in savings over that same time period. Should the committee fail to come to an agreement on those savings, automatic cuts totaling the same amount, split evenly between defense and domestic spending, are slated to occur. If that took place, defense spending would then be reduced by $600 billion, an average of $60 billion per year. That may sound like a huge dent in the Pentagon’s budget, but there are two things to keep in mind.
JBS Facebook JBS Twitter JBS YouTube JBS RSS Feed