The U.S. Department of Education has created the largest computerized database of personal information on American students ever gathered by any government in history. The exact personal and intimate facts in this database are outlined in the Student Data Handbook for Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education (NCES 94-303), released in 1994. Comprised of 228 pages plus about 100 pages of appendices, this handbook can be obtained from the U.S. Dept. of Education. Send for your own copy and prepare to be appalled. Or just read this article and find out what to do.  
President Obama signed his 86th executive order (13575) on June 9, which established the White House Rural Council (WHRC). According to The Blaze, the Executive Order seems to be in line with the United Nations radical Agenda 21, as it is designed “to begin taking control over almost all aspects of the lives of 16 percent of the American people.”
In 1846, in the aftermath of the U.S. annexation of Texas, Mexican forces attacked Americans at Fort Brown, Texas, at the Rio Grande River — in part over a border dispute. Later, the city of Brownsville, named after Major Jacob Brown, grew around the fort and presided over much of Texas’ rich and colorful history. Contributing to that history is the beautiful Rio Grande River, which is also the international border between the United States and Mexico. Nowadays, the city finds itself in the uneasy position of, once again, defining that border. Parts of the city and the lush farmlands around it (known in Texas as “the Valley”) are now severed by an ugly 18-foot iron fence that has forever altered peaceful Valley life and stands as a harbinger of uncertainty and discord as border tensions escalate. The New American traveled to Brownsville to investigate the fence and its unintended consequences.
As travelers and state governments across America fight back against invasive screening by the Transportation Security Administration at airports, the TSA is actually expanding its operations covering busses, trains, ships, ferries, subways, and even highways. But critics, who say the methods are unconstitutional and often constitute sexual assault, are up in arms.  
Britain's leading financial newspaper, the London Financial Times, now believes that the U.S. economy may be headed toward a Japanese-style "Lost Decade."
It was announced June 15 that scientists are now fairly sure that around 2020, sunspot activity is going to lessen significantly. All the conditions for it are lining up so far. In layman’s language, less active sun, with fewer sunspots, can produce cooling because solar flares are diminished. Technically, this condition is a “solar minimum.” The last time it happened, experts say, we had a “Little Ice Age.”  
Texas Governor Rick Perry agreed on Monday to add the wildly popular anti-TSA groping bill to the special session of the Texas Legislature. His decision to call up the bill followed almost a month of intense and unrelenting pressure from his constituents.
The U.S. Supreme Court may have just opened the floodgates to individuals wishing to challenge various federal laws on the grounds that they violate the 10th Amendment. In a unanimous decision, the court ruled that individuals do have standing to make such legal challenges if they can demonstrate that they will suffer harm if the laws they are challenging are applied to them.  
High-ranking Texas officials groped by agents with the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) are sounding off about the scandal in the press, adding more pressure on state lawmakers and Gov. Rick Perry to resurrect a bill criminalizing the invasive measures without probable cause.
On Thursday the United States Senate voted to end the 45 cents-per-gallon subsidy currently supporting the ethanol industry. The bill, offered by liberal Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and conservative Senator Tom Coburn (R-Okla.), was passed overwhelmingly, 73-27.
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