Recall Drive Officially Launched Against Wisc. Governor

By:  Dave Bohon
11/17/2011
       
Recall Drive Officially Launched Against Wisc. Governor

It has been all the talk on Wisconsin political blogs, talk shows, and editorial pages for the past several months. Now it is official: on November 15 virulent opponents of Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker officially launched a recall drive against him, in what can only be described as a vindictive attempt at political payback for his success at reining in collective bargaining for state employees. But just who Democrats will choose to run against the popular conservative state leader — should they garner the half a million or so needed recall petition signatures — is still up in the air.

 

It has been all the talk on Wisconsin political blogs, talk shows, and editorial pages for the past several months. Now it is official: on November 15 virulent opponents of Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker (photo) officially launched a recall drive against him, in what can only be described as a vindictive attempt at political payback for his success at reining in collective bargaining for state employees. But just who Democrats will choose to run against the popular conservative state leader — should they garner the half a million or so needed recall petition signatures — is still up in the air.

While Walker had to have been in office at least a year before a recall challenge was mounted, Democrats had reportedly been busily planning with union leaders and other strategists on how to mobilize quickly in mid-November to begin gathering the more than 540,000 signatures they would need to collect by January 17 in order to force a recall election. If their effort is successful, it would mark only the third time in U.S. history that a recall election has been held for state governor. Previously only North Dakota and California had recalled their governors, in both cases defeating the seated candidate.

The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel newspaper explained the process: “Once the signatures are filed, the accountability board under state law would have 31 days — until Feb. 17 — to review the petitions. If the board found enough valid signatures had been filed, it would call for an election on March 27. That election would become a primary if more than two members of any party ran, creating a general recall election on April 24.”

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