Reminiscences of a Libertarian: Lessons for Today

By:  Sam Blumenfeld
11/16/2011
       
Reminiscences of a Libertarian: Lessons for Today

I suppose you could call me a “right-wing extremist,” although I don’t consider myself an extremist by any stretch of the imagination. But that’s the way the liberals have labeled us, and since they control so much of the printed and electronic media we have no choice but to roll with their punches. I am an individualist as opposed to a collectivist. As a writer, I willingly spend a lot of time alone at my word-processor. In the old days, it was the typewriter. Today it is the much more accommodating word-processor. But in my case, individualism was the reason why I could work so well alone. I was by no means a loner, but I never minded being alone with my thoughts, or while writing, or reading a book, visiting a museum, or traveling to new cities. I’ve always had good friends, but I also enjoy my own company.

I spent seven years writing my book on the Shakespeare authorship controversy, The Marlowe-Shakespeare Connection. I had to read a lot of what others had written on the subject. I had to read all of Marlowe and all of Shakespeare. I probably could have earned a doctorate at some university on the basis of the research and writing I put into the project. Of course, I also had an economic motive in mind. I thought it would be an easy sell and earn me my retirement. That was a big mistake. It turned out to be a tough sell, so tough that when McFarland, a publisher of scholarly books in North Carolina, accepted it for publication without paying an advance, I was happy indeed.

I suppose you could call me a “right-wing extremist,” although I don’t consider myself an extremist by any stretch of the imagination. But that’s the way the liberals have labeled us, and since they control so much of the printed and electronic media we have no choice but to roll with their punches. I am an individualist as opposed to a collectivist. As a writer, I willingly spend a lot of time alone at my word-processor. In the old days, it was the typewriter. Today it is the much more accommodating word-processor. But in my case, individualism was the reason why I could work so well alone. I was by no means a loner, but I never minded being alone with my thoughts, or while writing, or reading a book, visiting a museum, or traveling to new cities. I’ve always had good friends, but I also enjoy my own company.

I spent seven years writing my book on the Shakespeare authorship controversy, The Marlowe-Shakespeare Connection. I had to read a lot of what others had written on the subject. I had to read all of Marlowe and all of Shakespeare. I probably could have earned a doctorate at some university on the basis of the research and writing I put into the project. Of course, I also had an economic motive in mind. I thought it would be an easy sell and earn me my retirement. That was a big mistake. It turned out to be a tough sell, so tough that when McFarland, a publisher of scholarly books in North Carolina, accepted it for publication without paying an advance, I was happy indeed.

How did I become a right-wing extremist? I was born in New York City and attended its public schools, which in my day were pretty decent. They taught everyone the basic academic skills in the traditional manner so that you learned to read, write, and calculate in a way that expanded your brain power and made you competent enough to enter the adult world and get a job. There was no attempt to indoctrinate you in anything but basic Americanism. The teachers respected your religion, your family values, and assumed that you had a soul. In fact, our principal recited the 23rd Psalm at every assembly which indeed acknowledged the existence of a higher power which most, if not all, of us believed in.

Click here to read the entire article.

Sam Blumenfeld (photo)

The JBS Weekly Member Update offers activism tips, new educational tools, upcoming events, and JBS perspective. Every Monday this e-newsletter will keep you informed on current action projects and offer insight into news events you won't hear from the mainstream media.
JBS Facebook JBS Twitter JBS YouTube JBS RSS Feed