Canadian Study Confirms Advantages of Homeschooling

By:  Dave Bohon
09/19/2011
       
Canadian Study Confirms Advantages of Homeschooling

A recent Canadian study has confirmed what has been known for over two decades — much to the chagrin of public school officials: Homeschoolers perform better than public school students in the crucial core academic disciplines of reading and math.

The study, published in the Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science, compared the standardized test scores of 37 homeschooled students between the ages of five and 10 to those of 37 public school counterparts, finding that while public school students typically tested at or slightly above their grade level, homeschooled kids performed about a half grade higher in math and 2.2 grades higher in reading.

In explaining the differences in scores, Sandra Martin-Chang, a professor at Concordia University and the study’s lead author, said that the structure of homeschooling “may offer opportunities for academic performance beyond those typically experienced in public schools [including] smaller class sizes, more individualized instruction, or more academic time spent on core subjects such as reading and writing.”

A recent Canadian study has confirmed what has been known for over two decades — much to the chagrin of public school officials: Homeschoolers perform better than public school students in the crucial core academic disciplines of reading and math.

The study, published in the Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science, compared the standardized test scores of 37 homeschooled students between the ages of five and 10 to those of 37 public school counterparts, finding that while public school students typically tested at or slightly above their grade level, homeschooled kids performed about a half grade higher in math and 2.2 grades higher in reading.

In explaining the differences in scores, Sandra Martin-Chang, a professor at Concordia University and the study’s lead author, said that the structure of homeschooling “may offer opportunities for academic performance beyond those typically experienced in public schools [including] smaller class sizes, more individualized instruction, or more academic time spent on core subjects such as reading and writing.”

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