New York Subway System May Stop Station Trash Pickup

By:  Bruce Walker
10/26/2011
       
New York Subway System May Stop Station Trash Pickup

The Metropolitan Transit Authority of New York, a state agency which controls the New York City Transit Authority, has run the city's subways since 1965. (The two privately owned systems, the Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit Corporation [BMT] and the Interborough Rapid Transit Company [IRT] were bought by the city in 1940.)  The mass of New Yorkers simply cannot get around their city without subways, and government owns the subways. The MTA is facing a budgetary crisis, and its director, Jay Walder, left several months ago after a $10-billion capital shortfall was revealed.

How is the MTA going to handle this financial problem? The “amenities” offered to its customers are already scant. There are only 129 public restrooms for the 468 stations. Rats have become an extremely pressing problem in some MTA stations. Now New York is considering removing all trash cans from some of the subway platforms as a cost-saving measure.

This plan is already being tested at the Main Street Station on Number 7 line in Flushing, Queens, and at the Eighth Street N and R stations in Manhattan. If it succeeds, then it may be expanded to other stations. The no-bin experiment is being justified on the grounds that the MTA has more trash that it can handle. Crews remove 8,500 trash bags from MTA stations each day.

The Metropolitan Transit Authority of New York, a state agency which controls the New York City Transit Authority, has run the city's subways since 1965. (The two privately owned systems, the Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit Corporation [BMT] and the Interborough Rapid Transit Company [IRT] were bought by the city in 1940.)  The mass of New Yorkers simply cannot get around their city without subways, and government owns the subways. The MTA is facing a budgetary crisis, and its director, Jay Walder, left several months ago after a $10-billion capital shortfall was revealed.

How is the MTA going to handle this financial problem? The “amenities” offered to its customers are already scant. There are only 129 public restrooms for the 468 stations. Rats have become an extremely pressing problem in some MTA stations. Now New York is considering removing all trash cans from some of the subway platforms as a cost-saving measure.

This plan is already being tested at the Main Street Station on Number 7 line in Flushing, Queens, and at the Eighth Street N and R stations in Manhattan. If it succeeds, then it may be expanded to other stations. The no-bin experiment is being justified on the grounds that the MTA has more trash that it can handle. Crews remove 8,500 trash bags from MTA stations each day.

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