Are Our Rights From God or the UN?

JBS CEO Art Thompson's weekly news video update for Oct. 13 - 19, 2014.

The Importance of Understanding the U.S. Constitution

JBS CEO Art Thompson's weekly news video update for Oct. 6 - 12, 2014.

The Effects of a Prolonged War in the Middle East

JBS CEO Art Thompson's weekly news video update for Sept. 29 - Oct. 5, 2014.

Dangers of Arming 'Moderate' Muslims

JBS CEO Art Thompson's weekly news video update for September 22 - 28, 2014.

Republicans and Democrats Working Together to Rewrite the Constitution

Created to bring about an Article V convention, the predominantly Republican Assembly of S...

  • Are Our Rights From God or the UN?

    Friday, October 10 2014 13:35

    Published in News

  • The Importance of Understanding the U.S. Constitution

    Monday, October 06 2014 10:21

    Published in News

  • The Effects of a Prolonged War in the Middle East

    Monday, September 29 2014 15:08

    Published in News

  • Dangers of Arming 'Moderate' Muslims

    Monday, September 22 2014 15:26

    Published in News

  • Republicans and Democrats Working Together to Rewrite the Constitution

    Tuesday, September 09 2014 15:33

    Published in News

The John Birch Society
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit on Tuesday unanimously upheld a lower court ruling enjoining the enforcement of an amendment to the Oklahoma state constitution that barred state courts from taking Sharia law into consideration when deciding cases.  Although the measure received overwhelming support from the citizens of the Sooner State, it was immediately challenged in court by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR).
The exit polls following the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary showed something remarkable that somehow missed the evening news: Paul consistently won the votes of the young, the disaffected, the independent, as well as discouraged Democrats. CNN’s exit polls in New Hampshire showed Paul winning almost half the voters aged 18-29 (compared to Romney’s 26 percent), and splitting the vote with Romney in the 30-to-39 age bracket. Paul also won 35 percent of unmarried voters, 40 percent of those who had never voted in a primary before, one-third of the independent vote, and nearly half of those with no religious affiliation. He also took a third of those who characterized themselves as “somewhat liberal” in their outlook.
Will a northern plains state axe the property tax? This June, residents of North Dakota will vote on a primary ballot measure which, if approved by voters, would eliminate local property taxes, retroactive as of January 1, 2012.  There could be no better place than the Flickertail State — which has the lowest unemployment rate in the country and a thriving energy-based economy — to attempt this unprecedented experiment in government by the people.    
While diverging from Ron Paul on a number of political issues, Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.) says he is not ready to see the liberty-minded Texas Congressman withdraw from the GOP presidential race. "I really don’t want Ron Paul to drop out until whoever our front-runner is is collecting some of the ideas that he’s talking about," DeMint said when the Daily Caller asked him whether it was time for other GOP contenders to relinquish their campaigns and support former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney, who took first place in both the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary.  
As Minnesota voters gear up to vote on a state constitutional amendment defining marriage as only between a man and a woman, the Catholic Church’s archbishop for Minneapolis and St. Paul has ordered priests in his diocese to show their support for the amendment effort — and the church’s stand on the institution of marriage, which they promised to defend when they were ordained — or remain silent.  According to the Progressive Catholic Voice, a blog that supports same-sex marriage, the letter from Archbishop John Niensedt was addressed to the priests and deacons of the archdiocese and was originally published in the Archdiocesan Updates newsletter.   In the epistle to his fellow priests, Niensedt, who has been a vocal supporter of the marriage amendment, wrote, “I do not believe it is an exaggeration to say that in this movement to protect and defend the definition of marriage as a union between one man and one woman we are faced with one of the greatest challenges of our times.” He warned that the goal of those who oppose passage of the marriage amendment “is not just to secure certain benefits for a particular minority, but, I believe, to eliminate the need for marriage altogether.”
In what some legal analysts consider the most significant decision covering religious freedom in the last 20 years, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled January 11 that a religious organization has the right to fire an employee under the 1964 Civil Rights Act’s “ministerial exception” clause.    
Moments after placing a strong second in the New Hampshire primary, Ron Paul sent a message to all the other Republican presidential candidates who have never been Governor of Massachusetts: Get out of the race so I can beat Mitt Romney.  In a statement, Paul’s national campaign chairman Jesse Benton asserted that Paul’s strong finish in the Granite State, and his “top-tier showing in Iowa,” demonstrate that “he is the sole Republican candidate who can take on and defeat both Mitt Romney and Barack Obama.”  
Iranian officials are accusing the U.S. and Israeli governments of assassinating another senior nuclear scientist in Tehran, using a car-bomb terrorist attack as part of the expanding covert war against Iran. American authorities denied the allegations and condemned the violence, but a spokesman for the Israeli military left room for speculation.  
In November 2011, Commentary magazine asked 41 members of the cultural elite — writers thinkers, and professors — whether or not they were optimistic or pessimistic about America’s future. While most of the comments dwelt on political and economic issues, some of the contributors pointed to our education system as a source of their pessimism.  
President Obama lauded the hard work and dedication of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) employees on Tuesday, assuring them that he will stand by their side amid a burgeoning sentiment from congressional Republicans that the EPA's environmental regulations will devastate the economy and kill American jobs. He also told EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson and the roughly 800 EPA employees who gathered at the headquarters in Washington that new government regulations on power plant emissions will save "thousands" of lives and inhibit "cases of childhood asthma."   "Just a few weeks ago, thanks to the hard work of so many of you, Lisa and I were able to announce new common-sense standards to better protect the air we breathe from mercury and other harmful air pollution," Obama professed, referring to new federal rules adopted in December to regulate mercury and other emissions from coal power plants. "And because we acted, we’re going to prevent thousands of premature deaths, thousands of heart attacks and cases of childhood asthma."   In his succinct monologue, the President added that EPA regulations can help generate jobs and promote economic growth, such as through jobs wherein people work to restore contaminated areas and through fuel-efficient vehicles that will ease the burden of high gas prices so that consumers can "go spend on something else."
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