Constitution Day

September 17, 2014 marks the 227th anniversary of the signing of the Constitution of the U...

Unanswered Questions About Middle East Terrorism

JBS CEO Art Thompson's weekly news video update for September 15 - 21, 2014.

NATO Being Positioned As Police Force for New World Order

JBS CEO Art Thompson's weekly news video update for September 8 - 14, 2014.

Why Is the U.S. Backing Communist Kurdish Terrorists?

JBS CEO Art Thompson's weekly news video update for August 25 - 31, 2014.

Oppose Obama's Bypassing of Senate With Climate Accord

The Obama administration plans to use "reflexive law" to bypass Senate for new climate acc...

  • Constitution Day

    Wednesday, September 17 2014 13:20

    Published in News

  • Unanswered Questions About Middle East Terrorism

    Monday, September 15 2014 15:40

    Published in News

  • NATO Being Positioned As Police Force for New World Order

    Monday, September 08 2014 11:40

    Published in News

  • Why Is the U.S. Backing Communist Kurdish Terrorists?

    Monday, August 25 2014 13:34

    Published in News

  • Oppose Obama's Bypassing of Senate With Climate Accord

    Thursday, September 11 2014 09:49

    Published in News

The John Birch Society
When New Jersey Governor Chris Christie picked Sohail Mohammed — a lawyer who had represented acquitted terror suspects after the September 11 attacks — to be a Superior Court judge, immediate objections forced him to defend his choice. Much of the criticism of his appointment focused on Mohammed’s alleged links to terrorism and the possibility that Mohammed would be inclined to follow Shariah law; however, in his unique brand of political rhetoric, Christie labeled his critics “ignorant” and “crazies.”  
If a country wishes to save its taxpayers some money, it should enact stiff immigration laws. That’s the conclusion of a report from the Danish Integration Ministry, according to Spiegel Online. Denmark has imposed tough measures to stem the flow of Third World immigrants, and those stricter laws have saved the taxpayers about $10 billion during the past decade. The country now boasts the strictest controls in the European Union. Though the Eurocrat left has voiced opposition to the tighter controls, conservatives believe that Denmark is in better shape than most countries that have been overrun by immigrants, many of whom join the welfare rolls and commit crimes.
George Soros, the hedge fund investor who called gold "the ultimate bubble," has divested his portfolio of nearly its entire investment in the precious metal, inciting many to fear that the price will very soon plummet, devaluing the specie-heavy portfolios of millions of investors. Like it or not, like him or not, attention must be paid to his movements. It can be very expensive to ignore the predictions of Soros. For example, on September 16, 1992 (a date subsequently known as “Black Wednesday”), one of the investment funds of Soros sold short more than $10 billion worth of pounds sterling, profiting from the British government's reluctance to adjust its interest rates to levels comparable to those of other European Exchange Rate Mechanism countries.
Federal spending for K-12 education increased by approximately 1,050 percent between 1970 and 2009 (the most recent years for which firm figures exist). But public schools — the ones almost 90 percent of U.S. children attend  — have seen negligible gains over that period. Private schools aren’t panaceas, either, thanks to university departments of teacher training that are steeped in spurious education “research” gushing from component agencies of the U.S. Department of Education (DoE), in defiance of federal law. Since its inception in 1976, the DoE has worked to control all aspects of schooling and circumvent local prerogatives, hiding its agenda in plain sight under the terms “Best Practices,” “reform,” and “innovation.” Its greatest helpmates have been state Governors, via the National Governors Association (NGA), the host center for “Best Practices”; the National Education Association (NEA); and UNESCO, to which the NEA, in particular, has contributed heavily since 1948. In short, the NGA, the NEA, and the DoE have colluded with the United Nations to bypass U.S. laws.
In a series of expected additional press releases, the Standard & Poor’s credit rating agency is expanding its downgrade of debt securities tied to the now-lower-rated sovereign debt of the United States, including Israeli bonds, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, and “pre-funded” municipal bonds. Other credits tied closely to U.S. sovereign debt are also expected to be downgraded shortly, with only a few exceptions. Most municipal bond issues are not pre-funded with U.S. Treasury securities, and so they aren’t likely to be affected, especially as they rely on local and regional sources of revenues, with little reliance on the federal government to back them up. And, at the moment at least, S&P continues to rate 13 states as AAA. These downgrades have set off a firestorm of protest, mostly from the White House and the Treasury Department. Secretary Timothy Geithner angrily expressed his views to NBC/CNBC News:
If a $14.3 trillion national debt sounds like a staggering sum, economist Lawrence Kotlikoff's estimate of the nation's real  long-term indebtedness might bowl you over. Kotlikoff, who was a senior economist on President Reagan's Council of Economic Advisers, calculates the debt at $211 trillion. "We have all these unofficial debts that are massive compared to the official debt," Kotlikoff, a professor at Boston University, said on the weekend edition of National Public Radio's All Things Considered. "If you add up all the promises that have been made for spending obligations, including defense expenditures," Kotlikoff said, "and you subtract all the taxes that we expect to collect, the difference is $211 trillion. That's the fiscal gap. That's our true indebtedness."
Former Federal Reserve Bank Chairman Alan Greenspan came up with a novel way to claim the U.S. government would never default on debt: print the difference. Greenspan told NBC's "Meet the Press" August 7, in response to a question about the recent downgrade in the U.S. bond rating by Standard and Poor's: This is not an issue of credit rating. The United States can pay any debt it has because we can always print money to do that. So there is zero probability of default. Analysts ask, Zimbabwe-like inflation of the dollar is not default? They say that Greenspan won't find that argument very persuasive to bond-holders, who won't be able to buy anything with their bonds when they come due.
On Friday, Standard & Poor's kept its word and downgraded the U.S. credit rating for the first time in history — from AAA to AA+. The action came because the debt bill passed last week is not considered stringent enough to stabilize the debt crisis. Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner has already railed against the credit agency, saying it has shown “terrible judgment” in its decision, but some are using the rating downgrade to call for Geithner’s resignation, a move that Geithner had already been considering. At the behest of President Obama, however, Geithner has decided to stay for now. “Secretary Geithner has let the president know that he plans to stay on in his position at Treasury," Jenni LeCompte, assistant secretary for public affairs, said in a statement today in Washington. "He looks forward to the important work ahead on the challenges facing our great country." Bloomberg reports:
For over 10 years Ohio judge James DeWeese has fought for his constitutionally guaranteed right to display the Ten Commandments in his courtroom. And during that entire time he has been thwarted by a series of federal court rulings fueled by manipulative arguments of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). Now, with the help of the conservative American Center for Law and Justice (ACLJ), Judge DeWeese will try to take his case to the U.S. Supreme Court. As reported by The New American, it all began back in 2000 when the ACLU successfully sued for the removal of a display DeWeese had placed in his courtroom that included both the Declaration of Independence and the Ten Commandments. Reported The New American last February: “DeWeese followed up in 2006 by again posting the Ten Commandments, but re-titling them ‘Philosophies of Law in Conflict’ and referring to them as a set of ‘moral absolutes’ which he compared to a series of ‘moral relatives,’ such as, ‘The universe is self-existent and not created,’ and, ‘Ethics depend on the person and the situation.’”
Sixteen nations, all of them sources of illegal aliens who cross Mexico’s border into the United States, have filed briefs concurring with the U.S. Justice Department’s lawsuit against Alabama to block the enforcement of the state’s newly passed immigration law. The briefs claim the law, HB 56, impedes the relations between the United States and those nations, the Montgomery Advertiser reports. Along with the Justice Department’s attack on Alabama, another challenge to the law came from the usual coalition of open-borders advocates, including Mobile's Roman Catholic archbishop, who has used the issue to press the case that tough immigration laws are inherently racist. A federal judge has consolidated the lawsuits.
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