SuperCommittee Is a Super Failure

By:  Thomas R. Eddlem
11/22/2011
       
SuperCommittee Is a Super Failure

The so-called SuperCommittee charged with finding $1.2 trillion in cuts over a 10-year period beginning in 2013 found its Kryptonite: itself. The members of what is officially known as the "Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction" admitted defeat in a November 21 press release where members stated, "We have come to the conclusion today that it will not be possible to make any bipartisan agreement available to the public before the committee’s deadline."

 

The so-called SuperCommittee charged with finding $1.2 trillion in cuts over a 10-year period beginning in 2013 found its Kryptonite: itself. The members of what is officially known as the "Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction" admitted defeat in a November 21 press release where members stated, "We have come to the conclusion today that it will not be possible to make any bipartisan agreement available to the public before the committee’s deadline."

Not "any bipartisan agreement."  The announcement was met with scorn by presidential candidate and Congressman Ron Paul, who pointed out that the nominally impressive $1.2 trillion figure would only amount to about one-eighth of the expected 10-year combined deficits. Moreover, the committee could have "accomplished" its goal by merely cutting expected spending increases and not enacting real spending cuts. "This is only cutting proposed increases," Paul told The Hill November 21. "It has nothing to do with actually cutting anything. This shows how unserious politicians are about our very serious debt problems."  Rep. Paul has proposed a one trillion spending cut during the first year of his presidency, a proposal that would eliminate five cabinet agencies.

The SuperCommittee's press release says that "we remain hopeful that Congress can build on this committee’s work and can find a way to tackle this issue in a way that works for the American people and our economy.” One can only wonder — considering that the committee couldn't agree on even a penny of cuts — what the Congress would "build on" from the committee's work. The SuperCommittee seemed determined to prove an old joke about congressional committees: If you laid all the committee members end-to-end, they wouldn't reach a conclusion.

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Photo: Rep. Ron Paul

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