Why "No Child Left Behind" Hasn't Worked

By:  Sam Blumenfeld
01/27/2012
       
Why "No Child Left Behind" Hasn't Worked

For decades, I’ve been telling my readers that the federal government ought not to be in the education business and that constitutionalist members of Congress are duty bound to close down the Department of Education. The Cabinet-level department was created during the Carter administration as payback for the National Education Association’s help in getting him elected.

 

For decades, I’ve been telling my readers that the federal government ought not to be in the education business and that constitutionalist members of Congress are duty bound to close down the Department of Education. The Cabinet-level department was created during the Carter administration as payback for the National Education Association’s help in getting him elected.

President Reagan wanted to dump the department but was prevented from doing so by his own big-government Republicans. And when George H. W. Bush became President in 1989, he initiated another federal education program, Goals 2000. Ten years later, the Washington Post reported (12/10/99): “The nation has not met any of the eight educational goals for the year 2000 set by President Bush and the governors of all 50 states.”

But that didn’t stop newly elected George Bush from signing into law on his third day in office an even bigger federal program, No Child Left Behind, on January 8, 2002. Standing beside him were smiling Massachusetts Senator Ted Kennedy and other liberals. Our spendthrift Congressmen had passed the bill 384 to 45 in the House and 91 to 8 in the Senate.

The purpose of the law was to set certain academic standards for the schools and make the schools accountable for their performances. An article in Time magazine, marking the 10th anniversary of the bill (1/23/12), reported:

Click here to read the entire article.

Sam Blumenfeld (photo)

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