Obama Admin. Blames Bush-Era Law for Failure to Deport Illegals

By:  Warren Mass
07/09/2014
       
Obama Admin. Blames Bush-Era Law for Failure to Deport Illegals

Media reports support the findings of a Department of Homeland Security (DHS) report acknowledging that the Obama administration’s failure to deport illegal immigrants is among the “pull factors” prompting more people to follow suit. 

But the administration instead blames the William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008, signed into law by George W. Bush, for making it nearly impossible to deport unaccompanied minors to Central America.

An article in the Los Angeles Times on July 5, under the headline “Deportation data won't dispel rumors drawing migrant minors to U.S.” affirmed that reports that the Obama administration is not deporting illegal immigrants according to law are based on fact.

The Times writer noted that although the Obama administration has dismissed “rumors” circulated among Central Americans that they will be allowed to stay in the United States if they successfully cross the U.S. border, those rumors have increasingly proved to be true.

Citing Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) data released under a Freedom of Information Act request, the article noted that the number of immigrants under the age of 18 who were deported or turned away at ports of entry fell from 8,143 in 2008 (the last year of the George W. Bush administration) to 1,669 last year.

However, Obama administration officials deny that their lenient policies, including a 2012 program that allowed immigrants who had entered the country illegally as minors before June 2007 to apply for deportation “deferrals” (usually meaning "cancellations") have encouraged the recent flood of illegal immigration by unaccompanied minors.

The administration instead blames the William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008, which was signed into law by Bush. That law made it nearly impossible to deport unaccompanied minors to Central America without first letting them appear before an immigration judge. Because of the current backlog, the wait for such court appearances can be very lengthy, during which time the immigrant minors are released from custody. 

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Photo: AP Images

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