The attorney general of South Carolina told reporters Monday that the Supreme Court debate over the Patent Protection and Affordable Care Act is a life and death struggle, not about health care but about the Constitution.
A Minnesota-based pro-life group is raising awareness of the gruesome practice, approved by the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA), of research labs using the remains of aborted babies in medical research projects. In a recent news release, Minnesota Citizens Concerned for Life (MCCL) reported that the FDA has approved a clinical trial by StemCells Inc., which uses brain tissue from aborted babies to treat macular degeneration. According to MCCL, the research firm injects the fetal brain cells into the eyes of patients suffering from the degenerative condition to study the effect of the cells on vision.  
Friday’s announcement by President Obama that his nominee for president of the World Bank would be Dartmouth College’s President Jim Yong Kim was a surprise, for a number of reasons.    
Republicans see rising oil and gasoline prices as an opportunity to score political points on President Obama. To be sure, Obama is partly responsible for the rise in world prices and could do something about it. The irony is that Republicans would emphatically oppose the one measure that would be most effective in easing the pressure on prices right now: defusing tension in the Middle East by taking the war threat against Iran off the table.  
What made America one of the greatest nations on earth? Can its citizens rediscover that greatness before their nation is overcome by mediocrity, selfishness, and sin? In the new film Monumental: In Search of America’s National Treasure, premiering March 27 for one night in over 550 theaters nationwide, former Hollywood actor (now a Christian apologist) Kirk Cameron takes a look back at the generations that founded America to determine what special characteristics they had that gave the nation its momentum toward greatness and prosperity. He also looks at where the nation stands today to try to determine if its people can reach back and re-embrace the qualities that made America a shining light for the world.  
After once touting Solyndra as a success story, President Obama sought to distance himself from the now-bankrupt and scandal-plagued manufacturer of solar panels, blaming Congress and China for the debacle instead of accepting responsibility. Critics of the administration promptly blasted the comments.  
When a 1942 Supreme Court decision that most people never heard of makes the front page of the New York Times in 2012, you know that something unusual is going on.
In the context of last year’s final flight of NASA’s space shuttle, critics and supporters of the federal agency speculated about the future of human space flight — and the role of government in such endeavors. Private industry and several entrepreneurs have sought for many years to create a role for non-governmental space flight. Now one of the leaders in the aerospace industry is projecting a future for human exploration of the solar system with a far less astronomical price tag than those that have accompanied governmental space programs.  
If the Green Climate Fund (GCF) has its way, its actions will — like those of the United Nations — soon be considered to be above the laws of the nations of the world. While critics question the wisdom of investing any governmental body with such a lack of accountability, these criticisms take on a new urgency when one considers the fact that the GCF is not even a part of the UN.
President Obama benefits from a fundraising advantage that Republican presidential hopefuls can’t quite match: Access to the White House. According to an investigation by The Associated Press, over 60 of the President’s top campaign donors have attended the White House more than once for state dinners, holiday events, and meetings with top administration advisers.  
JBS Facebook JBS Twitter JBS YouTube JBS RSS Feed