FISA Court Continues Collusion with Federal Surveillance Programs

By:  Joe Wolverton, II, J.D.
03/14/2014
       
FISA Court Continues Collusion with Federal Surveillance Programs

The FISA Court continues covering up the record of the federal government's unconstitutional collection of personal data.

The documents leaked by Edward Snowden revealed more than just the National Security Agency’s nearly unchecked surveillance of millions of people worldwide. Another important aspect of the story was described in a recent New York Times article.

Charlie Savage and Laura Poitras write:

Previously, with narrow exceptions, an intelligence agency was permitted to disseminate information gathered from court-approved wiretaps only after deleting irrelevant private details and masking the names of innocent Americans who came into contact with a terrorism suspect. The Raw Take order significantly changed that system, documents show, allowing counterterrorism analysts at the N.S.A., the F.B.I. and the C.I.A. to share unfiltered personal information.

The leaked documents that refer to the rulings, including one called the “Large Content FISA” order and several more recent expansions of powers on sharing information, add new details to the emerging public understanding of a secret body of law that the court has developed since 2001. The files help explain how the court evolved from its original task — approving wiretap requests — to engaging in complex analysis of the law to justify activities like the bulk collection of data about Americans’ emails and phone calls.

Although its use has been perfected by the current occupant of the Oval Office, the so-called FISA court (officially the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court) is a creation of the previous president, George W. Bush.

The FISA Amendments Act was signed into law by President George W. Bush on July 10, 2008 after being overwhelmingly passed 293 to 129 in the House and 69-28 in the Senate. Just a couple of days prior to FISA being enacted, Representative Ron Paul led a coalition of Internet activists united to create a political action committee, Accountability Now. The sole purpose of the PAC was to conduct a money bomb in order to raise money to purchase ad buys to alert voters to the names of those congressmen (Republican and Democratic) who voted in favor of the act. 

George W. Bush’s signature was but the public pronouncement of the ersatz legality of the wiretapping that was otherwise revealed to the public in a New York Times article published on December 16, 2005. That article, entitled “Bush Lets U.S. Spy on Callers Without Courts,” described the brief history of the “anti-terrorist” program:

Click here to read the entire article.

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