Son of Drone Victim Sues Pakistani Gov't for Not Protecting its Citizens

By:  Joe Wolverton, II, J.D.
10/11/2012
       
Son of Drone Victim Sues Pakistani Gov't for Not Protecting its Citizens

There might be one way to influence U.S. policymakers to postpone the airborne assassinations using drone strikes. Noor Khan has filed suit against the government of Pakistan for its cooperation with the governments of the United States and the United Kingdom on behalf of his father who was killed in a U.S. drone strike while he attended a tribal council meeting on March 17, 2011, in the northwest region of Pakistan.

Despite and perhaps in defiance of a march in Pakistan protesting the United States’ drone war that is terrorizing that nation, news comes of a drone strike October 10 killing five people. Typically, no official word has been released revealing the target of the attack or the identities of the victims, but according to a story by Agence France-Presse (AFP) five "militants" were among the dead. “Several US drones flew into the area before dawn and fired four missiles on a compound, killing five militants,” a security official told AFP after the strike in Hurmuz area, east of Miranshah, the capital of North Waziristan tribal region.

Long War Journal reports that “the remotely piloted Predators or the more advanced Reapers fired four missiles at a compound in an area that AFP describes as “a lawless region known as a stronghold of Taliban and al Qaeda militants.”

This is the second drone attack in Pakistan in October. The first came on October 1.

In its story, AFP reports that “the attacks by unmanned US aircraft remain contentious, they are deeply unpopular in Pakistan, which says they violate its sovereignty and fan anti-US sentiment, but American officials are said to believe they are too important to give up.”

Truly, the United States is unwavering in its commitment to the program of using remote control killing machines to kill those the White House or the CIA suspects of posing a potential threat to national security. No protest march and no appeal to the concept of sovereignty will dissuade the president from crossing names off his kill list. The near daily multiplying of victims of these assaults — whether militants or innocent mourners or a 15-year-old American — is not enough to derail the death-by-drone program that both President Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney promise to perpetuate after January.

There might be one way to influence U.S. policymakers to postpone the airborne assassinations, however. 

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Photo of Pakistanis protesting U.S. drone strikes in North Waziristan, Pakistan: AP Images

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