As resistance intensifies to the Obama administration’s mandate requiring employers to offer health insurance that includes free access to contraception, a federal judge has ruled that pharmacists in Washington State can be guided by their consciences rather than the state with regard to stocking and distributing abortifacients — the types of contraceptive drugs that can cause abortions.

On February 18 at a mosque in Berlin, Connecticut, citizens from all walks of life and all political persuasions came together to organize themselves in opposition to the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), particularly provisions of that recently enacted law that provide for the arrest and indefinite detention of American citizens by the military.

Sixteen years after President Bill Clinton signed it into law, and 12 months after President Obama ordered the Department of Justice to stop defending it, a federal judge in San Francisco ruled Wednesday that the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) is unconstitutional because it bars health insurance and other benefits from being extended to the same-sex partners of government employees. DOMA defines marriage as the legal union of only a man and a woman for purposes of federal business.

At 11:30 p.m. on September 2, 2010, Bishnu Shresta, a 35-year-old Gurkha soldier on his way home following his retirement from the Indian army, was awakened suddenly when the train he was on was stopped by a gang of 30 thugs.

 

Media Matters has come under fire after the Daily Caller exposed the liberal watchdog group for accepting a $50,000 grant to monitor and probe religious outlets. The Christian Post first reported that the National Religious Broadcasters (NRB), an association of broadcasters and Christian communicators, was anticipating an investigation by the Internal Revenue Service into whether or not Media Matters violated its 501(c)(3) status when it collected money from a special interest group to scrutinize religious conservatives.
 
 

Thankfully, the twentieth GOP presidential debate has come and gone.  If the American voter doesn’t know these candidates by now, he never will.  Of the four remaining candidates, three are virtually indistinguishable from one another. This much has been established time and time again throughout this election season. It is true, of course, that there exist some differences between Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum, and Newt Gingrich. But such differences are negligible, both in themselves and, especially, relative to the enormity of the similarities that they share.
 
 

As Christians around the world pray and wait for word about the fate of Iranian pastor Youcef Nadarkhani, the Obama administration has added its voice to those demanding that the Iranian government release the Christian minister, who was sentenced to death last year for refusing to renounce his faith.
 
 

On February 15, the sentencing hearing was held in Michigan in the case of Umar Abdulmutallab, the young Nigerian man convicted of attempting to detonate a bomb on an airplane over Detroit on Christmas Day 2009. At that hearing, a most compelling statement was read by Kurt Haskell, a passenger onboard Northwest Flight 253, the same flight chosen by Abdulmutallab to carry out his potentially catastrophic mission. Abdulmutallab was sentenced to life in prison for his crimes.
 
 

With the Pentagon’s announcement in early February that it plans to ease restrictions on women serving in combat roles, the bulk of Republican presidential candidates appear to have no problem putting women military personnel deeper in harm’s way. As reported by the Associated Press, while the proposed new rules “are expected to continue the long-held prohibition that prevents women from serving as infantry, armor and special operations forces … they will formally allow women to serve in other jobs at the battalion level, which until now had been considered too close to combat.”

 

It seems like yesterday, but it was during the 2008 presidential race that John McCain and Barack Obama debated their respective worthiness to be the next U.S. President in a televised debate at a famous church in Southern California. The host was Pastor Rick Warren and the venue was his Saddleback Community Church in Orange County.

 

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