Congress Must Fix the Indefinite Detention Provision of the NDAA Law

01/04/2012
       
Congress Must Fix the Indefinite Detention Provision of the NDAA Law

There are two new bills in Congress to fix the indefinite detention policy in the new NDAA law.

There are two worthwhile legislative initiatives underway in Congress to counteract the unconstitutional, new detention policy included in the recently passed and signed National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). 



Read "Rep. Landry Offers Amendment to NDAA to Protect Civil Liberties" to learn about Rep. Jeff Landry's (R-La.) new bill H.R. 3676 to amend Section 1021 of the NDAA to restore all the rights of due process to American citizens. 



Read "Feinstein Introduces Due Process Guarantee Act" to learn about Senator Dianne Feinstein's (D-Calif.) new bill S. 2003 "To clarify that an authorization to use military force, a declaration of war, or any similar authority shall not authorize the detention without charge or trial of a citizen or lawful permanent resident of the United States and for other purposes." A companion bill, H.R. 3702, has been introduced in the House by Rep. John Garamendi (D-Calif.). 



Landry's H.R. 3676 has 31 cosponsors; Feinstein's S. 2003 has 15; and Garamendi's H.R. 3702 has 29. 



Send a message to your Representative and Senators, asking them to counteract the unconstitutional detention policy in the new NDAA law by passing Landry's H.R. 3676 in both the House and Senate, Garamendi's H.R. 3702 (companion bill to S. 2003) in the House, and Feinstein's S. 2003 in the Senate.
 

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