Communist China Uses “Journalists” as Spies, Ex-Xinhua Writer Confirms

By:  Alex Newman
08/27/2012
       
Communist China Uses “Journalists” as Spies, Ex-Xinhua Writer Confirms

 The communist dictatorship ruling mainland China uses its so-called “news agencies” and “journalists” to spy on dissidents and foreign governments, charged Canadian author and reporter Mark Bourrie, who resigned from the regime’s Xinhua service after realizing what was going on. He recently blew the whistle on the scheme — long suspected by intelligence agencies and well documented by analysts — with an explosive August 23 article in Ottawa Magazine.

The communist dictatorship ruling mainland China uses its so-called “news agencies” and “journalists” to spy on dissidents and foreign governments, charged Canadian author and reporter Mark Bourrie, who resigned from the regime’s Xinhua service after realizing what was going on. He recently blew the whistle on the scheme — long suspected by intelligence agencies and well documented by analysts — with an explosive August 23 article in Ottawa Magazine.

According to Bourrie, a respected journalist with insider access to Canadian politics, his Chinese editors regularly requested articles on critics of the regime and their activities in Canada. Those stories, unsurprisingly, were never published, sparking suspicions by Bourrie that he was being used to collect intelligence.

One assignment, for example, was to find the names and addresses of people who protested against a 2010 visit by Chinese tyrant Hu Jintao to Canada. Another involved determining which Canadian government department was charged with suppressing “evil cults” — an obvious reference to Falun Gong, a spiritual discipline that was banned by the Chinese regime and is now relentlessly persecuted.

Then, in April, Xinhua asked Bourrie to cover a visit by the Dalai Lama. The Buddhist spiritual leader opposes the ongoing communist Chinese occupation and destruction of Tibet, so he is considered an enemy by the communist dictatorship. According to Bourrie, the sole purpose of the assignment was to gather intelligence for Beijing.

“They tried to get me … to write a report for the Chinese government on the Dalai Lama using my press credentials as a way of getting access I wouldn’t otherwise have,” Bourrie explained in an interview with Canada’s National Post. “We were there under false pretenses, pretending to be journalists but acting as government agents.”

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