Despite Protests, Islamists to Draft New Egyptian Constitution

By:  James Heiser
03/29/2012
       
Despite Protests, Islamists to Draft New Egyptian Constitution

As the Muslim Brotherhood continues building a future for Egypt that would place that nation in the ranks of the radical Islamist regimes, the U.S. State Department continues to downplay the course of events in the aftermath of the “Arab Spring.” But as the Egyptian government begins the process of drafting a new national constitution, it is clear that Islamists will dominate the process.*

 

As the Muslim Brotherhood continues building a future for Egypt that would place that nation in the ranks of the radical Islamist regimes, the U.S. State Department continues to downplay the course of events in the aftermath of the “Arab Spring.” But as the Egyptian government begins the process of drafting a new national constitution, it is clear that Islamists will dominate the process.*

In recent months, members of the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party and the Al-Nour party gained a clear majority of seats in both houses of the Egyptian parliament. As reported for The New American on February 28:

The Islamist Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party took 58 percent of the available seats in the upper house of Egypt’s parliament, while the even more extremist Salafist Al-Nour party took a quarter of the seats. In all, more than 80 percent of the contended seats in Egypt’s upper parliament are now in the hands of Muslim extremists. Last year’s “Arab Spring” is now more fully manifesting its true character: the transformation of Egypt into a more stridently Islamist regime.

One of the results of that clear majority is that the drafting of the new Egyptian constitution will be overseen by a man whose views are in keeping with those of the newly elected parliament, Mohamed Saad Al-Katatni. Al-Katatni (pictured) had been imprisoned during the last days of the Mubarak government because of his involvement with the Muslim Brotherhood. Following last year’s revolution, he founded the Freedom and Justice Party and became the secretary-general of the party. Following the triumph of his party in the parliamentary elections, Al-Katatni resigned as secretary-general of the party on January 22, and was elected Speaker of the lower house of Egypt’s parliament—the People’s Assembly—the next day. Some might argue that it was virtually inevitable that Al-Katatni would be assigned the role of overseeing the drafting of the nation’s new constitution.

Click here to read the entire article.

The JBS Weekly Member Update offers activism tips, new educational tools, upcoming events, and JBS perspective. Every Monday this e-newsletter will keep you informed on current action projects and offer insight into news events you won't hear from the mainstream media.
JBS Facebook JBS Twitter JBS YouTube JBS RSS Feed