Medal of Honor Recipient Dakota Meyer Battles Defense Contractor

By:  Dave Bohon
12/05/2011
       
Medal of Honor Recipient Dakota Meyer Battles Defense Contractor

Two months after receiving the Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest award for military bravery, former Marine Sergeant Dakota Meyer finds himself in an intense battle with a potentially far more pernicious foe than the Afghan Taliban: a global defense and security contractor with ties to the U.S. military.

In late November Meyer filed a lawsuit against his former employer, the U.K.-based defense contractor BAE Systems, for what he charges is retaliation against him after he criticized the company’s pending sale of high-tech sniper scopes to the Pakistani military. According to the suit, after Meyer resigned from BAE in protest over the sale, the company effectively blocked his hiring by another company by claiming he had a drinking problem and was mentally unstable.

 

Two months after receiving the Medal of Honor, the nation’s highest award for military bravery, former Marine Sergeant Dakota Meyer finds himself in an intense battle with a potentially far more pernicious foe than the Afghan Taliban: a global defense and security contractor with ties to the U.S. military.

In late November Meyer filed a lawsuit against his former employer, the U.K.-based defense contractor BAE Systems, for what he charges is retaliation against him after he criticized the company’s pending sale of high-tech sniper scopes to the Pakistani military. According to the suit, after Meyer resigned from BAE in protest over the sale, the company effectively blocked his hiring by another company by claiming he had a drinking problem and was mentally unstable.

As reported by The New American, Meyer was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions in 2009 during a six-hour battle in Afghanistan’s Kunar province, during which he fought “five times through an enemy ambush in an Afghan valley to help rescue three dozen comrades and recover four fallen American soldiers.”

After leaving active duty in May 2010, Meyer went to work for Ausgar Technologies, a defense contractor that hired him to teach U.S. soldiers how to use thermal imaging to spot roadside bombs. Less than a year later, Meyer moved over to BAE, where, the suit details, he soon learned that the company was trying to sell advanced thermal optic scopes to Pakistan. Like fellow Marines who had served along the Afghan-Pakistan border, Meyer had a healthy distrust of Pakistan's military, which has long been suspected of providing aid and equipment to the Taliban.

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Photo of Dakota Meyer: AP Images

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