Education and the Election

By:  Sam Blumenfeld
11/08/2012
       
Education and the Election

Seventy-five years of progressive public education has paid off big-time for the Democrat Party. The popular vote indicates that slightly more than half the electorate preferred a failed community organizer to an experienced problem-solver with a great economic vision for our future. Why? Because they don’t understand the difference between socialism and capitalism. Recently, when I asked a young computer repairman what was the difference between socialism and capitalism, his answer was: “A socialist government is for all the people. A capitalist government is for the few.” He had been well indoctrinated by his Marxist teachers.

Seventy-five years of progressive public education has paid off big-time for the Democrat Party. The popular vote indicates that slightly more than half the electorate preferred a failed community organizer to an experienced problem-solver with a great economic vision for our future. Why? Because they don’t understand the difference between socialism and capitalism. Recently, when I asked a young computer repairman what was the difference between socialism and capitalism, his answer was: “A socialist government is for all the people. A capitalist government is for the few.” He had been well indoctrinated by his Marxist teachers.

And so the United States will enter a dark period of economic turmoil, ruled by socialists in Washington who will continue to do for America what Hugo Chavez has done for Venezuela. The electorate that voted to keep Barrack Hussein Obama in the White House represents the most ignorant body of voters in American history. They are the great American illiterates who don’t read books or even newspapers. They belong to the great educational underclass, deliberately created by our public schools, so that they will vote every four years for whomever the left puts up for election.

In 2007, the National Endowment for the Arts released its report, Reading at Risk, on the continuing decline of American literacy. Its chairman, Dana Gioia, stated: “This is a massive social problem. We are losing the majority of the new generation. They will not achieve anything close to their potential because of poor reading.”

According to the report, the number of 17-year-olds who never read for pleasure increased from 9 percent in 1984 to 19 percent in 2004. Almost half of Americans between the ages of 18 and 24 never read books for pleasure.

In 1988, Arthur O. Sulzberger, publisher of the New York Times, told a meeting of newspaper publishers: "Today up to 60 million Americans — one third of the adult population — cannot read their local newspaper. As we edge closer to the 21st century, life is becoming more complex and will become more difficult for adults who cannot read.

And we have just seen the results of this growing national illiteracy in the presidential election. And as long as the public schools keep using teaching methods that create functional illiteracy, the intelligence of the American people will continue to decline.

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Sam Blumenfeld (photo)

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