Egyptian Election Chaos Feeds on Lack of Trust

By:  James Heiser
06/22/2012
       
Egyptian Election Chaos Feeds on Lack of Trust

 With both candidates in the Egyptian presidential election claiming victory, while the commission overseeing the elections delays releasing the results, Egypt faces the possibility of further revolutionary chaos.

With both candidates in the Egyptian presidential election claiming victory, while the commission overseeing the elections delays releasing the results, Egypt faces the possibility of further revolutionary chaos.

 

 

While the commission overseeing Egypt’s presidential election has delayed release of the official vote tallies, supporters of Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohamed Morsi are already protesting that the nation’s military is trying to steal the election. The Presidential Election Commission maintains that it needs time to investigate roughly 400 accusations of voter fraud — accusations brought by both sides in the hotly contested race — before releasing the results of June 16–17 vote. Meanwhile, according to press reports, both Morsi and his opponent — former Prime Minister Ahmed Shafik — are claiming victory, with the Morsi campaign claiming a total of 52 percent of the vote, and Shafik claiming 51.5 percent.

As reported previously for The New American, Morsi’s allies in the Egyptian parliament attempted to remove Shafik from the race only days before the election by passing a law that would have banned him from the presidency based on his service in the Mubarak regime. Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court threw out the law as unconstitutional, and then removed one-third of the members of parliament, claiming that Egyptian election laws had been violated in their selection. The court’s action effectively dissolved the Egyptian parliament.

Although the official results of the election were scheduled to be released on Thursday, the Muslim Brotherhood proclaimed victory on the morning after the election, and began to denounce the Egyptian military claiming that those who had been overseeing the nation’s transition to a more democratic state were subverting the democratic process. And, unwilling to wait until the elections commission had finished its work, the Brotherhood began to flood Tahrir Square with protestors in an effort to conjure up memories of the ‘Arab Spring’ uprising which brought down the Mubarak government. As Reuters reports, the Brotherhood has gone so far as to begin busing its supporters in, even as it denies that the organization is seeking a confrontation:

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