Former Global Warming Supporter Now Shows Data that Refutes It

By:  Bob Adelmann
08/09/2012
       
Former Global Warming Supporter Now Shows Data that Refutes It

In his testimony August 1 before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, climate scientist John Christy revealed the results of his latest work showing “clear evidence … that extreme high temperatures are not increasing in frequency, but actually appear to be decreasing.” Christy does his research at the University of Alabama, monitoring global temperature changes through remote satellite sensing which he developed along with a partner, Roy Spencer. For his efforts, Christy has been awarded NASA’s Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement and the American Meteorological Society’s “Special Award.”

In his testimony August 1 before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, climate scientist John Christy revealed the results of his latest work showing “clear evidence … that extreme high temperatures are not increasing in frequency, but actually appear to be decreasing.” Christy does his research at the University of Alabama, monitoring global temperature changes through remote satellite sensing which he developed along with a partner, Roy Spencer. For his efforts, Christy has been awarded NASA’s Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement and the American Meteorological Society’s “Special Award.”

In his testimony, Christy presented evidence that current concerns about recent events — heat waves, wild fires, droughts, freak storms, and flooding — do not in fact reflect climate change (global warming) caused by humans, and concerns about human-caused global warming are in fact overblown. What Christy did was analyze the number of state record high and low temperatures, by decade, and concluded that “since 1960, there have been more all-time cold records set than hot records in each decade.”

When critics noted that there are only 50 states with this data — a possibly statistically insignificant number from which to draw such conclusions — Christy then looked at “the year-by-year numbers of daily all-time record high temperatures from a set of 970 weather stations with at least 80 years of record,” and found that additional data not only confirmed his original conclusion, but expanded it: There were several years with more than 6,000 record-setting highs before 1940, but no years with over 5,000 record highs after 1954.

He then went on to explain that since tracking temperature change is a long-term proposition, he created 10-year moving averages of temperatures recorded from 704 stations that had at least 100 years of data. The result? Average high temperatures have dropped significantly since the 1930s, with averages running at about half of those recorded back then.

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