May Day Fails to Revitalize Occupy Wall Street

By:  William F. Jasper
05/03/2012
       
May Day Fails to Revitalize Occupy Wall Street

The Occupy Wall Street (OWS) plan to turn out millions of protesters on May Day for a "General Strike" turned out to be a general failure, attracting mostly small crowds of hardcore leftists and revolutionaries.

The Occupy Wall Street (OWS) plan to turn out millions of protesters on May Day for a "General Strike" turned out to be a general failure, attracting mostly small crowds of hardcore leftists and revolutionaries.

 

The massive May Day protests and the general strike that Occupy Wall Street organizers had been calling for didn’t materialize. Perhaps as many as a thousand or more protesters, bolstered by union members, turned out in New York City. In Los Angeles, a similarly-sized crowd, estimated by the Los Angeles Times as “more than 1,000 immigrants rights protesters and Occupy activists” marched through the downtown area to Pershing Square. Turnouts in other cities were much smaller.

The demonstrations were generally peaceful, although confrontations and dozens of arrests were reported in New York, Los Angeles, and elsewhere. In Oakland, California, which was the site of violent protests last year, police used tear gas and flash-bang grenades to disperse crowds that reportedly were throwing bottles and attacking the police. Some protesters also, it has been reported, were attempting forcibly to close businesses that had chosen to stay open, in violation of the OWS call for a May Day “general strike.”

Across the bay, in San Francisco, a flash mob of black-clad anarchists attacked shops and businesses along a swath of the Mission District. The Los Angeles Times reported

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Photo of Occupy Wall Street protestors in Oakland, Calif.: AP Images

 

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