Nobel Peace Prize for the EU: Far-Left Politics Behind the Scenes

By:  William F. Jasper
10/16/2012
       
Nobel Peace Prize for the EU: Far-Left Politics Behind the Scenes

The Norwegian Nobel Committee, on October 10, named the European Union as the winner of the 2012 Nobel Peace Prize. The choice has struck many observers as odd, since the EU is anything but peaceful.

The Norwegian Nobel Committee, on October 10, named the European Union as the winner of the 2012 Nobel Peace Prize. The choice has struck many observers as odd, since the EU is anything but peaceful, with the euro plummeting, sky-high unemployment soaring ever higher, and on-going riots plaguing Athens, Madrid, Brussels, and other major European cities for much of the past two years. Indeed, many analysts have seriously wondered if the entire “Project” (as the EU architects refer to the “evolving” European superstate) might soon unravel completely.

However, that is precisely the point; the Nobel Committee made a conscious political decision to give the European Union a badly needed public relations boost. "This is, in a way, a message to Europe that we should do everything we can and move forward," said Thorbjen Jagland, the chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee.

"We want to remind all Europeans about what we have achieved on this continent and that we should not let it start disintegrating again and getting nationalism and extremism (to) grow on this continent, because we know what that leads to," Jagland said.

What went unmentioned in much of the media coverage of the awarding of the Peace Prize was that Thorbjen Jagland is not only the chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, but also secretary-general of the Council of Europe, which acts as the primary propaganda organ and facilitating engine for further integration and unification of the European Union. The Council of Europe and the EU have been joined at the hip since the 1950s.

Also not mentioned in the copious EU-Nobel coverage is the as-yet unanswered charge that Jagland, a former Norwegian prime minister, was an agent/informant of the Soviet KGB (code name "Jurij") during the 1970s.

The KGB charge is not at all far-fetched, considering Jagland’s political pedigree.

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Photo: European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso addresses the media after the 2012 Nobel Peace Prize was given to the EU, at the European Commission headquarters in Brussels, Oct. 12, 2012: AP Images

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