North American Union Far From a Dead Proposal

By:  John F. McManus
08/16/2012
       
Trilateral Meeting of the Defense Ministers of Mexico, Canada, and the United States (U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta on right) in Ottawa on March 27, 2012. Trilateral Meeting of the Defense Ministers of Mexico, Canada, and the United States (U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta on right) in Ottawa on March 27, 2012.

 The North American Defense Ministers meeting in March was a step toward the NAU. On March 27, 2012, the Defense Ministers of Canada, the United States and Mexico met in Ottawa. Attendees at this inaugural trilateral meeting included U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta and his counterparts from America’s neighboring nations.

On March 27, 2012, the Defense Ministers of Canada, the United States and Mexico met in Ottawa. Attendees at this inaugural trilateral meeting included U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta and his counterparts from America’s neighboring nations. Canadian Defense Minister Peter MacKay said that because the three countries “share common challenges and concerns,” there must be formalized “cooperation between our three countries.” Neither he nor the other defense chiefs mentioned the more ambitious goal of forming a sovereignty-canceling North American Union (NAU). But there can be little doubt that this is precisely what they had in mind.

Plans to destroy the independence of the Western Hemisphere nations on the way to a UN-controlled world government have been around for decades. Though these designs have long simmered in the minds of the globalists, movement toward the goal formally began with the proposed Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) signed by Bill Clinton in 1994. Patterned after NAFTA, the FTAA uniting 34 nations in the Western Hemisphere, said Mr. Clinton, could be established by 2005. Successor George W. Bush repeated the 2005 target date in speeches soon after he took office in 2001. It was “free trade” that the two presidents and their globalist allies expected to employ in order to compromise independence and take a huge step toward world government. The FTAA’s “Declaration of Principles” openly stated the pact’s subservience to the UN.
 
But a huge campaign of opposition, led mainly by our Society, put a halt to the plan and persuaded the FTAA enthusiasts to slow down and regroup. Instead of promoting a union of 34 nations, they decided to focus on building a North American Union (NAU) among Canada, the United States, and Mexico. The loudest cheerleader for the NAU turned out to be American University professor and Council on Foreign Relations member Robert A. Pastor. His effort received strong assistance from the CFR and its president, Richard Haass.
 
To spur the creation of NAU, President George W. Bush met with Mexico’s President Fox and Canada’s Premier Martin in Waco, Texas, in 2005 where they formed the Security and Prosperity Partnership (SPP). Bush unintentionally revealed the real goal of their effort when he referred to the SPP as the creator of a “union” of the three nations. More opposition, now directed at the SPP, encouraged the three national leaders to change its name to North American Leaders Summit (NALS).
 
Robert Pastor’s personal history supplies a key to understanding how subversive this drive for the NAU truly is. In the mid-1970s, he served as the executive director of the commission that called for turning over the U.S. Canal in Panama to the Panamanian government led by Communist Omar Torrijos. President Clinton later named him as our nation’s ambassador to Panama, but that appointment was blocked by Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Jesse Helms (R-N.C.).
 
In 1989, Pastor co-authored a book with Mexican diplomat Jorge Castañeda, an early member of Mexico’s Communist Party. Castañeda also authored a favorable biography of Che Guevara, the Latin American revolutionary who greatly aided Communist Fidel Castro in the takeover of Cuba. Pastor’s colleague then became a key figure in the administration of Mexico’s President Vicente Fox, and the two Mexicans aggressively advocated an open U.S.-Mexico border while championing the so-called rights of illegal immigrants within the United States.
 
The author of more than a dozen books and articles, Pastor’s thoughts are regularly published in Foreign Affairs, the journal of the Council on Foreign Relations. He was welcomed to membership in this seat of the internationalist Establishment in 1997. Several of his works in which he shared authorship with Castañeda have appeared in the CFR’s flagship publication.
 
Previously focusing on a merger between only the United States and Mexico, Pastor wrote Toward a North American Community: Lessons From the Old World for the New in 2001. He was now including Canada in the overall plan, even proposing creation of a new currency called the Amero. In one of his Foreign Affairs articles appearing in 2004, he boldly called for terminating national sovereignty, stating that “evidence suggests that North Americans are ready for a new relationship that renders the old definition of sovereignty obsolete.”
 
By 2005, Pastor had become the chief author of the CFR report Building a North American Community, a summary of the work of a 31-member task force made up of globalists from the three countries. This report urged a more comprehensive North American military force, financial aid to Mexico, a North American court and a companion lawmaking authority, and several more entanglements for the three countries. When testifying before the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee, he brazenly referred to “North Americans,” not to Mexicans, Americans and Canadians.
 
In 2011, Pastor issued another book The North American Idea: A Vision for a Continental Future. Amazingly, he denied that he ever intended to form a North American Union. But his goal of uniting the three countries on the way to a New World Order led by the United Nations remains just as it has existed for the past 20-plus years.
 
We urge contact with incumbent members of Congress and the many candidates for national congressional office to alert them to this scheme and obtain pledges from them to block it from ever becoming a reality. The independence of our nation is at stake and it must be preserved.
 
(This article was first published in the JBS Bulletin, September 2012.)
(Click here to order a pamphlet to educate others about the threat posed by the NAU scheme.)
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