Remembering the Lonely Struggle of Otto Otepka

By:  Bruce Walker
04/13/2012
       
Remembering the Lonely Struggle of Otto Otepka

Otto Otepka is not a name that automatically rings bells in the minds of most Americans, even those Americans with a historical understanding of the role of communism in suborning our government. Yet as William Gill relates in his magisterial work, The Ordeal of Otto Otepka, often lonely individuals guided only by their patriotism, their conscience, and their faith have been the Horatio at the Bridge, protecting the rest of us from evil.

 
 

Otto Otepka is not a name that automatically rings bells in the minds of most Americans, even those Americans with a historical understanding of the role of communism in suborning our government. Yet as William Gill relates in his magisterial work, The Ordeal of Otto Otepka, often lonely individuals guided only by their patriotism, their conscience, and their faith have been the Horatio at the Bridge, protecting the rest of us from evil.

 
Otepka was the child of Czech immigrants who came to America before the First World War. He excelled at school and at hard work and, through dint of effort, rose up in American government. By the time that John F. Kennedy became President, Otepka had attained the position of Deputy Director of the Office of Security of the U.S. Department of State. This was a civil service job, not a political appointment, and was intended to provide a check on politicians who played fast and loose with our nation’s security.
 
The Secretary of State was Dean Rusk, the man who had been Assistant Secretary of State for Far Eastern Affairs under Truman. It was he who urged Truman in 1950 to send American troops to South Korea, but as part of the United Nations forces, part of the “collective security” dreams of “One World” collectivists. Having urged Truman to send our boys into war, Rusk proceeded to keep Chiang Kai-shek, who had a battle-tested army on Formosa, from helping us fight the invading Communist forces. Even more disturbing, when Truman met MacArthur at Wake Island on October 15, 1950, Rusk was there listening as MacArthur advised Truman that the Chinese armies north of the Yalu River would not attack because overwhelming American air power could destroy the bridges over that river as well as attack the lines of supply north of the river. Rusk, known as “the Buddha,” raised no objections. (Truman's Secretary of State, George Marshall, who like Dean Rusk was a member of the internationalist Council on Foreign Relations, once boasted that he had disarmed 39 of Chaing Kai-shek's anti-communist divisions “with a stroke of the pen.” )
 
Click here to read the entire article.
The JBS Weekly Member Update offers activism tips, new educational tools, upcoming events, and JBS perspective. Every Monday this e-newsletter will keep you informed on current action projects and offer insight into news events you won't hear from the mainstream media.
JBS Facebook JBS Twitter JBS YouTube JBS RSS Feed