Reparations Via Crazy Horse Slots

By:  Ralph R. Reiland
07/12/2011
       
Reparations Via Crazy Horse Slots

Sea Isle, N.J. — James Fenimore Cooper's historical novel The Last of the Mohicans concludes with Tamenund (1628-98), the tribal leader of an Indian clan in the Delaware Valley, lamenting the pain of old age and the near-extinction of his people.

"Why should Tamenund stay?" he asks. "The pale-faces are the masters of the earth, and the time of the red-man has not yet come again."

Well, there's big news up the beach in Atlantic City that would bring a big smile to the old chief's face.
 

Sea Isle, N.J. — James Fenimore Cooper's historical novel The Last of the Mohicans concludes with Tamenund (1628-98), the tribal leader of an Indian clan in the Delaware Valley, lamenting the pain of old age and the near-extinction of his people.

"Why should Tamenund stay?" he asks. "The pale-faces are the masters of the earth, and the time of the red-man has not yet come again."

Well, there's big news up the beach in Atlantic City that would bring a big smile to the old chief's face.

Click here to read the entire article.

Ralph R. Reiland (photo) is an associate professor of economics and the B. Kenneth Simon professor of free enterprise at Robert Morris University in Pittsburgh.
 

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