What Is Educational Excellence? Without God — Nothing

By:  Sam Blumenfeld
08/16/2012
       
What Is Educational Excellence? Without God — Nothing

 The two killers at Columbine High School, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, were excellent readers and writers. They were intelligent, clever, and self-motivated. Yet, lacking a foundation in Biblical studies, or moral ethics of any kind, the moral absolutes of the Bible had no meaning for them.

Can you have educational excellence without God? On a superficial basis you can. For example the two killers at Columbine High School, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, were excellent readers and writers. They were intelligent, clever, and self-motivated. In their senior year Eric and Dylan began a video production class. They made movies. Dave Cullen writes in Columbine:

Eric was gobbling up literature: Macbeth, King Lear, Tess of the d’Ubervilles. He could never get enough Nietzsche or Hobbes. Once a week, he wrote a short essay for English class on one of the stories or sometimes on a random topic. ... In September, Eric titled one of his short essays, “is Murder or Breaking the Law Ever Justified?” Yes, he responded — in extreme situations. ... The law must bend. Eric made the same case in his journal but took it a step further: moral imperatives are situational, absolutes are imaginary; therefore, he could kill anyone he wanted.

In other words, the moral absolutes of the Bible had no meaning for him. “Thou shalt not murder” was imaginary. Morals are situational. That’s what our humanist-atheist schools teach these days, and Eric agreed with what he was being taught. There is even a book on the subject, Situation Ethics, The New Morality by Joseph Fletcher, published in 1966, written for use by pastors and educators. On the matter of stealing, Fletcher wrote (p. 59):

It cannot be said that it is wrong to take away a man’s possessions against his will, for that would condemn all taxation — or the removal of a revolver from a homicidal maniac; neither of these is stealing — which is always wrong; though high authority has held that a starving man may steal a loaf of bread rather than die of hunger, because life is of more value than property and should be chosen first for preservation if both cannot be preserved together.

An extreme situation is always used to justify disobeying “Thou shalt not steal.” If the starving man were a believer, he would ask for a loaf of bread, for in civilized society people are always more than willing to help a starving man. He would not have to steal the bread.

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Sam Blumenfeld (photo)

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