As UN Orders Expanded Global Drug War, Critics Fight Back

By:  Alex Newman
03/15/2013
       
As UN Orders Expanded Global Drug War, Critics Fight Back

Despite openly admitting the failure of prohibition by conceding that drug use has not declined after decades of United Nations-mandated “war on drugs” policies, the UN and its mostly totalitarian member regimes have been meeting this week in Vienna, Austria, seeking to expand the controversial drug war even further. Critics of the dubious UN “Commission on Narcotic Drugs” (CND) schemes, however — ranging from a coalition of American law enforcement officers to Latin American heads of state — are increasingly calling for new approaches to the problem.

Despite openly admitting the failure of prohibition by conceding that drug use has not declined after decades of United Nations-mandated “war on drugs” policies, the UN and its mostly totalitarian member regimes have been meeting this week (March 11-15) in Vienna, Austria, seeking to expand the controversial drug war even further. Critics of the dubious UN “Commission on Narcotic Drugs” (CND) schemes, however — ranging from a coalition of American law enforcement officers to Latin American heads of state — are increasingly calling for new approaches to the problem.

Among the most prominent and vocal opponents of the UN’s ongoing narcotics machinations is Socialist Bolivian President Evo Morales (shown), who slammed the global prohibition regime as a failure. Even former Soviet Communist diplomat-turned planetary drug czar Yury Fedotov, executive director of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (ODC), admitted as much when he said "the overall prevalence of drug use is not decreasing.” Morales, however, went much further.

Speaking to the 56th session of the UN CND on Monday, the fiery South American leader said the international war has caused soaring violence and is being used as an "instrument of geopolitical domination." In typical fashion, Morales also took swipes at the U.S. government, which under Obama has expanded its ruthless, unconstitutional campaign of terror throughout Latin America under the guise of fighting the UN-mandated drug war. Morales slammed what he termed the “political use" of the drug war by "certain powers.”

Over a year ago, the Bolivian government, led by Morales, unilaterally withdrew from the UN “Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs” because the treaty purported to prohibit the use of the coca leaf, which has a long history in the region among indigenous people even though it is now often used to manufacture cocaine. At the latest global summit, held from March 11 to 15, the Bolivian leader continued his crusade against what he called the failed approach to dealing with the narcotics trade.

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Photo of Bolivian President Evo Morales speaking to the press at the UNODC conference in Vienna, Austria March 11: AP Images

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