As many of my readers know, history is no longer taught in our schools as the means of knowing the past in chronological order. It is taught under the rubric of “social studies,” a category invented by the Progressives as part of their dumbing-down of young Americans with a curriculum tailored to turn the youth into socialists. Which means that most Americans have no sense of cause and effect, because history is now taught as unconnected episodes describing unpleasant facts about America’s past: the white man’s destruction of Indian culture; the slave trade; the struggle of the labor movement; the robber barons of the Industrial Revolution; the exploitation of child labor by cruel capitalists; our cheating the Mexicans out of the Southwest.  
The shooting of Florida teen Trayvon Martin has drawn national attention to the incident with many commentators already drawing conclusions about guilt and innocence in the matter. New information and evidence in the case continues to feed the controversy.  
It is not often that I agree with Geraldo Rivera, but recently he said something very practical and potentially life-saving, when he urged black and Hispanic parents not to let their children go around wearing hoodies.  
The Obama administration is surging forward with a first-of-its-kind EPA rule for new power plants, in what Republicans and industry groups say will inflate electricity prices and possibly kill off coal, the preeminent U.S. energy source. The EPA announced the rule Tuesday, with a goal to curb carbon dioxide emissions by imposing strict regulations on new coal-fired plants, including a limit that caps plant emissions to not more than 1,000 tons of carbon dioxide per megawatt-hour of energy generated.  
From about A.D. 950 to 1250, the North Atlantic region of the globe experienced a period of higher-than-normal temperatures. Known as the Medieval Warm Period (MWP), it was a time in which crops could grow much further north than is now common and oceanic ice did not come as far south. Eventually the warming was reversed, and the world was plunged into the equally long Little Ice Age (LIA), lasting from about 1400 to 1700.
The attorney general of South Carolina told reporters Monday that the Supreme Court debate over the Patent Protection and Affordable Care Act is a life and death struggle, not about health care but about the Constitution.
A Minnesota-based pro-life group is raising awareness of the gruesome practice, approved by the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA), of research labs using the remains of aborted babies in medical research projects. In a recent news release, Minnesota Citizens Concerned for Life (MCCL) reported that the FDA has approved a clinical trial by StemCells Inc., which uses brain tissue from aborted babies to treat macular degeneration. According to MCCL, the research firm injects the fetal brain cells into the eyes of patients suffering from the degenerative condition to study the effect of the cells on vision.  
Friday’s announcement by President Obama that his nominee for president of the World Bank would be Dartmouth College’s President Jim Yong Kim was a surprise, for a number of reasons.    
Republicans see rising oil and gasoline prices as an opportunity to score political points on President Obama. To be sure, Obama is partly responsible for the rise in world prices and could do something about it. The irony is that Republicans would emphatically oppose the one measure that would be most effective in easing the pressure on prices right now: defusing tension in the Middle East by taking the war threat against Iran off the table.  
What made America one of the greatest nations on earth? Can its citizens rediscover that greatness before their nation is overcome by mediocrity, selfishness, and sin? In the new film Monumental: In Search of America’s National Treasure, premiering March 27 for one night in over 550 theaters nationwide, former Hollywood actor (now a Christian apologist) Kirk Cameron takes a look back at the generations that founded America to determine what special characteristics they had that gave the nation its momentum toward greatness and prosperity. He also looks at where the nation stands today to try to determine if its people can reach back and re-embrace the qualities that made America a shining light for the world.  
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