ObamaCare: The Terrifying Consequences To Healthcare

By:  Tom DeWeese
02/19/2014
       
ObamaCare: The Terrifying Consequences To Healthcare

The Supreme Court called ObamaCare a tax. And that is exactly what it is. It is not a healthcare system. It is simply another way to redistribute individual American’s wealth into the bottomless pit of government control. The health of the patient is not even in the equation.

As the ObamaCare debate rages, we hear much about insurance companies, costs, and people’s ability to pay. We hear the policy defended as proponents tell us it will provide healthcare to those who never had it. Of course, these proponents never seem to explain how those who couldn’t afford healthcare when it was a choice can now afford an even more expensive cost now that government mandates it.

However, these debates about the pros and cons of ObamaCare basically focus on money. What about the real issue — healthcare? What will ObamaCare do to our medical system? How will it affect the quality of our care? How will it affect doctor’s decisions as they attempt to take care of our health needs? And, ultimately, in a system controlled by government bureaucrats and government-written manuals — who will really be making the decisions that determine our quality of life? These are the real questions that need to be the center of the debate. And the answers are terrifying.

I recently received a report from an oncologist, Dr. John Conroy, who is fighting the desperate battle to treat cancer. All of those concerned Americans who wear their pink ribbons and dash for miles in their stop-cancer marathons should take a long hard look at what Dr. Conroy reports to be the future of all American medicine. They may want to start running straight at Congress to save their own lives.

Obviously, Oncology is a very detailed science, difficult for the layman to understand. That’s why American healthcare has always promoted specialists. Let’s begin with a patient who has discovered a lump on her breast. She takes a mammogram, undergoes a biopsy, and is found to have adenocarcinoma. She is seen by an oncologist and certain questions need to be addressed.

As Dr. Conroy explains the process, first, doctors must determine the “Stage” or extent of the disease. The most common system for determining classification of malignant tumors and the extent of a person’s cancer is called the TNM system. “T” measures the size of the tumor and if it’s invaded nearby tissue. “N” determines regional lymph nodes that are involved. “M” measures the distance the cancer has spread from one part of the body to another. These measurements are critical in determining how sick the patient may be.

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