Should Only Police Have Right to Self-defense?

By:  Jack Kenny
08/28/2012
       
Should Only Police Have Right to Self-defense?

 Chiefs of police and other law-enforcement personnel have often argued and testified against the passage of "Stand Your Ground" laws that say non-criminals in public places are not required to retreat, but have a right to use deadly force to defend themselves or others from anyone threatening them with death or serious injury — despite the consequences.

 Chiefs of police and other law-enforcement personnel have often argued and testified against the passage of "Stand Your Ground" laws that say non-criminals in public places are not required to retreat, but have a right to use deadly force to defend themselves or others from anyone threatening them with death or serious injury.

"Trying to control shootings by members of a well-trained and disciplined police department is a daunting enough task," former Miami Police Chief John F. Timoney wrote in a March 24 op-ed piece in the New York Times. "Laws like 'stand your ground' give citizens unfettered power and discretion with no accountability. It is a recipe for disaster."

Timoney was writing in the aftermath of the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin in Florida earlier this year by neighborhood watch patrol volunteer George Zimmerman, who claimed Martin attacked him after Zimmerman had trailed the youth through neighborhood streets. The incident produced heated debate over Florida's "Stand Your Ground" law and whether Martin's shooting was justified as self-defense against a physical assault by the unarmed teenager.

But as recent mass-murder incidents have made clear, police do not always arrive in time to stop an assailant who is armed and using lethal force against innocent unarmed victims. And when they do, even "well-trained and disciplined police" officers sometimes miss their targets and hit innocent bystanders. Two police officers were on the scene of the shooting near the Empire State Building Friday, when Jeffery Johnson allegedly killed former co-worker Steven Ercolino with a bullet to the head fired at close range. Johnson then walked but a short distance before he encountered two police officers and, pulling his .45-caliber handgun out of a black canvas bag, aimed it at the officers. The two officers fired 16 rounds, killing Johnson, but injuring nine bystanders who were either struck directly or grazed by stray bullets. The wounded were taken to two city hospitals where their wounds were described as not life threatening, the New York Times reported

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