When the presidential campaign gets down to the wire every four years, it seems that voters are stuck with an unappealing “choice” between two major-party candidates who differ little on core issues — their rhetoric notwithstanding. This year's choice between Mitt Romney and Barack Obama is no different.  

The allegation by Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.) that GOP presidential contender Mitt Romney paid no taxes for a decade has spurred quite the controversy, which only intensified after Reid refused to disclose the anonymous source of his charge. Of course, the debacle magnified further after questions about the senator’s own personal wealth were resurrected.

 Conservative billionaire Charles Koch is going public with his massive efforts to influence politics in the short run and the direction of the country in the long run. Partly because of his determination to redirect the freedom conversation and partly because his efforts are beginning to have an impact, Koch is now coming into the public square with his beliefs and efforts. In the short run, he hopes his efforts will first show up in the November elections, but he also is working to influence the elections of 2016, 2020 and out.

 A Fox News poll taken between August 5 and August 7 purports to show that if the presidential election were held today, President Obama would defeat Republican challenger Mitt Romney by nine percentage points, but it likely doesn't represent the views of voters.

 It has been a Sunday tradition for many years at restaurants all over America: Bring in a church bulletin and get a discount on Sunday dinner. But a restaurant in Columbia, Pennsylvania, is now under investigation by the Pennsylvania Human Rights Commission after a self-identified atheist filed a charge of discrimination against it over its church discount.

 With the rise of the drones comes the rise of several critical questions of Constitutionality of their potential uses. One of the most crucial of those inquiries concerns the application of the Fourth Amendment’s prohibition against “unlawful searches and seizures” and the requirement that warrants be supported by affidavits “particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

 Paul Ryan may be the conservative’s conservative, but understand what that means: He’s out to save the welfare/warfare state from its own intrinsic unsustainability. He’s no small-government man.

When Ann Romney told CBS News that Barack Obama’s campaign against her husband amounted to nothing more than an all-out plan to “kill Mitt Romney,” she wasn’t lying. Obama’s team has dealt Romney a series of low blows, but his running mate’s latest comments struck a “new low,” according to Romney’s campaign.

Calling potential Republican vice-presidential candidate Paul Ryan’s budget plan a “fairy tale,” David Stockman, President Ronald Reagan’s budget director from 1981 to 1985, took Ryan’s plan to task for not recognizing reality and for leaving behind the legacy of the GOP’s glory days when it reveled in touting small government.

On the first day of a three-day bus tour of Iowa, President Barack Obama blamed Mitt Romney's new running mate for blocking a federal farm bill in the House and promised farmers $170 million in government meat and poultry purchases to offset the devastating drought that has resulted in crop failures and higher grain prices through much of the Midwest.

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