Combatting the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) flurry of new regulations on coal and other energy resources has become a campaign platform for Republicans in key battleground states. GOP contenders in states such as Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia are directing their focus to the Obama administration’s seemingly anti-coal agenda, while blaming their Democratic rivals for bolstering the EPA’s intrusive regulatory efforts.

 An Amish-Mennonite pastor who helped a woman flee the country with her daughter in order to keep the little girl from being handed over by court order to her lesbian former partner has been convicted by a Vermont jury of “aiding and abetting a parental kidnapping.” In 2009, pastor Kenneth L. Miller of Virginia helped former lesbian Lisa Miller (no relation) leave the country with her daughter Isabella, after a court granted custody of the child to Miller's lesbian former partner, Janet Jenkins. Jenkins is not biologically related to the girl, and never went through legal proceedings to adopt her.

 The Obama administration and its Energy Department are under fire over controversial “green energy” schemes yet again, with Republican lawmakers alleging on August 15 that senior officials may have violated federal law by attempting to conceal relevant records using private e-mail accounts. Last week, the House Oversight Committee also requested more information from President Obama about his personal involvement in funneling billions of taxpayer dollars to politically connected companies such as Solyndra that later failed.

 The Obama administration filed a brief this week urging the Supreme Court to uphold controversial racial preferences and affirmative action in public, federally subsidized university admissions, claiming that the government has a “vital” interest in perpetuating the use of race-based quotas and that the practice does not violate the U.S. Constitution’s “equal protection” clause. The case, Fisher v. University of Texas, surrounds a white student who alleged that she was unconstitutionally denied admission due to her race.

 As the size and sponsorship of the global surveillance network TrapWire continues to be revealed, the hacktivists of Anonymous are calling on those alarmed by the multinational monitoring apparatus to unite August 18 in concerted opposition. “As we learn about TrapWire and similar systems in the surveillance industry, it becomes more apparent that we must, at all costs, shut this system down and render it useless,” spokesmen for Anonymous wrote in a press release. Despite the purported power of the surveillance system, Anonymous recommends opponents protest peacefully.

When the presidential campaign gets down to the wire every four years, it seems that voters are stuck with an unappealing “choice” between two major-party candidates who differ little on core issues — their rhetoric notwithstanding. This year's choice between Mitt Romney and Barack Obama is no different.  

The allegation by Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.) that GOP presidential contender Mitt Romney paid no taxes for a decade has spurred quite the controversy, which only intensified after Reid refused to disclose the anonymous source of his charge. Of course, the debacle magnified further after questions about the senator’s own personal wealth were resurrected.

 Conservative billionaire Charles Koch is going public with his massive efforts to influence politics in the short run and the direction of the country in the long run. Partly because of his determination to redirect the freedom conversation and partly because his efforts are beginning to have an impact, Koch is now coming into the public square with his beliefs and efforts. In the short run, he hopes his efforts will first show up in the November elections, but he also is working to influence the elections of 2016, 2020 and out.

 A Fox News poll taken between August 5 and August 7 purports to show that if the presidential election were held today, President Obama would defeat Republican challenger Mitt Romney by nine percentage points, but it likely doesn't represent the views of voters.

 It has been a Sunday tradition for many years at restaurants all over America: Bring in a church bulletin and get a discount on Sunday dinner. But a restaurant in Columbia, Pennsylvania, is now under investigation by the Pennsylvania Human Rights Commission after a self-identified atheist filed a charge of discrimination against it over its church discount.

JBS Facebook JBS Twitter JBS YouTube JBS RSS Feed