Last night on the Sean Hannity Show, Senator Rand Paul (R-Ky.) endorsed Mitt Romney for President.

Instantly the Vice-presidential buzz filled the air with many asserting that the only thing that could compel the son of one presidential candidate to throw his support behind another one would be the promise of the number two spot on the Republican ticket.

Telling Hannity that his “first choice had always been [his] father,” Senator Paul went on to say that now that the nominating process his over he would be campaigning for former Governor of Massachusetts Mitt Romney.

 In his latest statement to his supporters, Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul answered a number of questions but left open many more. After announcing in May that he would no longer participate in any other presidential primaries but would concentrate instead on states where primaries had already been held in the hopes of generating additional support, his supporters now know two things: With 200 bound delegates he has no chance of winning the Republican nomination in Tampa, Florida, over the weekend of August 27. But he expects there will be more than 500 delegates there supporting his position, which is far more than anyone anticipated.

The Republican National Committee (RNC) has snatched up all the reservations at several venues near the site of its national convention in Tampa, Florida in August, perhaps to prevent supporters of Ron Paul from holding a planned “Paul Festival” at the Florida Fairgrounds during the entire weekend before the Convention.

As the global battle over parental rights heats up, Republicans in Congress responded on Tuesday by introducing a proposed amendment to the U.S. Constitution enshrining the liberty of parents to direct the upbringing and education of their children. Activists and lawmakers say the move is needed to permanently and explicitly guarantee what has long been recognized as a fundamental freedom.

Twenty-four percent (24%) of American adults believe states have the right to secede from the union and form an independent country, according to a recent survey conducted by polling professionals Rasmussen Reports.  In its telephone survey of 1,000 American adults conducted May 29-30, Rasmussen pollsters asked respondents the following question: "Do individual states have the right to leave the United States and form an independent country?"

Last Friday, Boeing debuted a high-powered, high-altitude drone — the Phantom Eye — in the sky over Edwards Air Force Base. 

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker has survived a recall effort by angry state employees, cruising to a decisive victory over Democratic challenger Tom Barrett.

Florida State Attorney Angela Corey, who is prosecuting George Zimmerman for second-degree murder in the killing of Trayvon Martin, reportedly threatened to sue Harvard University over the barrage of stinging criticism made by law Prof. Alan Dershowitz about the controversial prosecution. The well-known professor publicized the threats on Tuesday.

Judge Timothy Garcia of the state’s court of appeals upheld a ruling by New Mexico’s Civil Rights Commission that fined the owners of Elane Photography nearly $7,000 when the photographer refused to photograph two lesbians at their “commitment ceremony.”

The city council of Anaheim, California is taking the U.S. House of Representatives up on its admonition that America’s national motto, “In God We Trust,” ought to be proudly displayed in public schools and government buildings across America. On May 29, the southern California community’s governing body voted unanimously to include the motto, set in four-inch brushed-gold letters on a black background, in the City Council Chambers.

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